How to fix this connector


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Old 09-28-23, 01:37 PM
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How to fix this connector

This terminal is supposed to connect to the heating element of my GE oven. As you can see it's kind of welded out of shape. One of the edges is burnt off. Should I just replace the metal terminal at the end? Part recommendation? And how is this ultimately connected to the heating element? Soldered or clamped on?
https://i.imgur.com/BiFxFEE.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/KETNFfo.jpg




 
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Old 09-28-23, 02:03 PM
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I believe the burnt piece is the tab of the old element. You can confirm that by comparing to the new element. The part with the wire slips onto that tab. You should be able to pull or pry the burnt tab out but it may take some effort if welding has occurred. If it was a tight enough connection it probably did not weld at that end.
 
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Old 09-28-23, 02:18 PM
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You are correct John.... that is the tab of the heating element broken off and remains in the terminal.
You will need to replace the element and the crimp terminal.
Due to the high heat.... you must use crimp on terminals.
They must fit tight to the element.

A standard crimp tool works well on a non-insulated crimp.
You need .250 un-insulated female crimps.

If there is an issue hitting the back metal cover due to length.... look for right angle crimps.
Don't bother with insulated crimps.
 
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Old 09-28-23, 02:37 PM
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Yes, I was able to pull the severed heating element terminal out of the existing crimp. The crimp looks to be in good shape. Indeed, NO welding occurred! Thanks for your intuition on that 2john02458. So, at this point I guess I just need to buy a crimping tool? Do needle nose pliers not do the job?
This is what one of the connectors looks like on the new heating element...
https://i.imgur.com/oKlByU1.jpg

This is what the crimp looks like with the piece taken out...

 

Last edited by AndyRooney; 09-28-23 at 03:00 PM. Reason: add 2 new images
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Old 09-28-23, 03:44 PM
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If the crimp is in good shape.... why would you need a crimping tool ?
You need a new element.

It is extremely important that the crimp makes a good contact with the element.
The fitting must be tight to maintain full current transfer.
 
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Old 09-28-23, 03:54 PM
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I just thought that a proper tool was recommended to make the crimp clamp grab on to the contact on the heating element. Seems to me that a pair of needle nose pliers would be sufficient for the job.
I have a new heating element. This is what one of the connects looks like....


 

Last edited by PJmax; 09-28-23 at 04:58 PM. Reason: added pic
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Old 09-28-23, 04:03 PM
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The male fitting is tack welded on to the element. It cannot be repaired due to the extreme element heat. If the male fitting is broken off.... the element is shot.
 
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Old 09-28-23, 04:42 PM
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I have a brand new heating element. This is what one of the two connectors looks like.

Or maybe you're talking about the crimp on the wire that runs into the stove? Perhaps there is supposed to be a little dimple in there for the tiny hole on the heating element connector to grab onto?
 

Last edited by PJmax; 09-28-23 at 04:59 PM.
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Old 09-28-23, 05:01 PM
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No.... you don't need a crimp tool to tighten your existing crimp. Pliers are fine.
Just be sure it fits snugly. Can't be easily pulled off.
 
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Old 09-28-23, 05:43 PM
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Clean it up as much as you can before sliding it on to the element. Shiny would be great but real clean for good contact will be OK. Use a bit of 220 grit or higher sandpaper.
 
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