At what point should you replace washer and dryer?


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Old 11-02-23, 04:19 PM
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At what point should you replace washer and dryer?

When we moved into this house 15 years ago, we bought a new LG washer and dryer. I remember at the time, the salesman said they tend to only last about 5-7 years but after 15, they are still going. During that time, I had to replace the solenoid and the pump on the washer and the thermostat on the dryer, but I did all that myself and it was fairly cheap and easy. Now, I notice the washer leaking a little bit again and I am sure I can find where it is leaking from and fix it, but I wonder if at some point it is just worth replacing because I feel like these have lasted a lot longer than expected. The dryer also doesn't seem to dry as well. Maybe it is just the auto setting, but even with that, I am constantly having to add another 20, 30, sometimes 40 minutes of manual dry time afterwards, especially with towels. I noticed lots of appliances on sale right now so this wouldn't be a bad time, and am totally ok with putting out $1500 or whatever. Maybe that is a better way to go than to wait until they die and have to pay full price and rush to get something. We also have a dog in the last year too so maybe that is going to be even harder on them with the extra hair. So what do you think? Is it a good idea to replace these, or try to fix the washer again and run them until they die?
 

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11-02-23, 05:58 PM
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Replace it when it breaks and it's not worth fixing. But don't spend money on an appliance that is working only because you think it's going to die. Or if its intended use is no longer giving satisfactory results.
 
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Old 11-02-23, 05:35 PM
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Personally, I prefer to replace major stuff on my schedule and not on its schedule, when I can plan the timing and get the exact item I prefer. I did this most recently for our HVAC system and our water heater. I thought that was especially important with the supply chain issues during peak Covid because lead times were often stupid long.

OTOH, you might easily get 5 more years out of your current pair after spending a little time and $$. Long dry time is often a case of needing a thorough cleaning of the vent system, inside the dryer and out, or maybe a sensor or two replacement. Long dry time can also be caused by a washer that isn't removing as much water as it should, which could have a simple cause.

When you replace something that works with something new, you are buying an unknown quantity...there is always a chance you'll get a lemon and have more problems with the new ones.

And of course, there are those that say the newer models take much longer to clean and dry clothes and there is some truth to that. Balancing that, new models use less water and energy.

A final thought: Doing without a washer or dryer for a week or two is not as big an inconvenience as doing with a fridge, for example. There are still laundromats around. The supply chain issues have eased. You might miss out on a sale, or have to settle for your second choice, but....

IIWM, I'd probably have a go at fixing them; if it turns out to be a rabbit hole, then you're only out a little time.
 
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Old 11-02-23, 05:56 PM
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I do think I keep the ducts clean, in that at least I clean them and actually cleaned out the whole inside of the dryer last time I had it apart, which is more than what most people probably do. It seems like I have had to re run it after it shuts off for several years now. Do you think a good culprit may be the auto dry sensor? Maybe it is only running like 20-30 minutes or less and shutting off instead of sensing how long the whole cycle should take.
 
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Old 11-02-23, 05:58 PM
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Replace it when it breaks and it's not worth fixing. But don't spend money on an appliance that is working only because you think it's going to die. Or if its intended use is no longer giving satisfactory results.
 
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Old 11-02-23, 06:12 PM
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I say put the money to replace them in something like a savings account where it stays liquid but earns you a little bit. Then, when one or both have given up the ghost, pull the trigger.
 
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Old 11-05-23, 04:42 PM
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Well, it took me about 5 minutes to find that it is leaking from the water inlet solenoid so I just ordered that part for under $10 I replaced the cold water inlet several years back and now it is the hot water inlet leaking.
 
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Old 11-05-23, 07:11 PM
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Good job. I've seen many more fill valve leaks on appliances.
 
 

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