Dust Deputy doesnt have enough cfm capacity for my vacuum.


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Old 02-13-16, 01:21 PM
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Dust Deputy doesnt have enough cfm capacity for my vacuum.

I am looking at purchasing a Dust Deputy, I have a rigid WD1851 I just bought. It is rated for 201CFM. It has a 2.5 inch hose.

The dust deputy is rated for 50-150CFM, The bigger dust deputy has a rating of at least 300 CFM up.

Can I use two Smaller dust deputies and run them in parallel to get the capacity i need. I plan on using this vacuum for drywall dust collection on a project.

Is there something that works as well as the dust deputy that has a higher CFM so I would only need one?

I suppose i could buy a smaller vacuum, but I like the fact that the wd1851 is fairly powerful.

I have a 3.5 HP Shop vac with a 14 gallon tank and that thing is almost useless for anything other than sawdust.

Any ideas?
 
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Old 02-13-16, 03:39 PM
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Are you doing all this for for just one job?
A drywall job done right requires little sanding.
I've used nothing but a Ridgid 10 gal. vac. with a drywall bag over the filter, I bought another hose to connected to the exhost port that I hang out a window.
 
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Old 02-13-16, 03:45 PM
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I bought another hose to connected to the exhaust port that I hang out a window.
That's the important thing..... blow the dust outside. (let the other guy deal with it)
 
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Old 02-13-16, 03:49 PM
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When sanding I also remove the screen in the window and set a cheap box fan in the window blowing out, tape off any registers, returns, door openings.
 
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Old 02-13-16, 04:05 PM
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To try to answer your question....I think two in parallel would work as long as you tried to keep the flow resistance of each path pretty close when you connect them together. You want as close to half the air to go through each one as possible.

If you search for shop vac cyclone you will get some other options.

A buddy of mine uses one of those pseudo-cyclone lids that snap onto a 5 gallon bucket or trash can. Because it's not a true cyclone, it normally only separates out bigger stuff, not dust. But when he's sanding drywall, he puts a couple of inches of water in the bottom and he said it works pretty well. Haven't tried it myself though.

I assume you know there are a number of vacs out there designed specially for drywall sanding. Pricey, but they are heads and shoulders above your typical noisy floor monster.
 
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Old 02-13-16, 05:06 PM
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I have a similar Rigid vac that I use with my Dust Deputy and it works just fine. I would just buy one and give it a try.
 
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Old 02-14-16, 09:04 AM
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Thanks everyone, I have the hepa filter ( I know its not a true hepa) on my vac and the dust bag inside as well.

I have an older 2.5 hp 6 gallon rigid and it has no provision to use a bag. I have used it for picking up masonry dust before and the filter clogs very quickly.

I suppose I could just use that vacuum and remove the filter and blow all the dust outside, I live in the country so its not like I have a neighbor right on top of me.
 
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Old 02-14-16, 09:07 AM
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Are you doing all this for for just one job?
A drywall job done right requires little sanding.
I've used nothing but a Ridgid 10 gal. vac. with a drywall bag over the filter, I bought another hose to connected to the exhaust port that I hang out a window.
Its just one job, a small bathroom. There is no window in there, but if I buy 20 ft of hose it should work.
 
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Old 02-14-16, 09:10 AM
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I assume you know there are a number of vacs out there designed specially for drywall sanding. Pricey, but they are heads and shoulders above your typical noisy floor monster.
Yes, I am not looking to spend that much. I suppose even if i bought a cheap vac and ruined it, it would still be cheaper...
 
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Old 02-24-16, 04:22 PM
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UPDATE. I have hooked up a standard dust deputy with my ridgid wd1851 and it seems to work great. I have a 5 layer hepa cartridge and a fine dust bag installed along with an exhaust diffuser so I am guessing with all those restrictions it lowers the total CFM to a 150 or less.

I haven't used it with drywall dust yet but I have vacuumed our carpeted stairs, and the amount of dust I pulled out of there that ended up in the dust deputies 5 gallon bucked was surprising, I assume a lot of the dust is the carpets backer degrading, its a fairly fine dust.

I will update how it works with drywall dust if I don't end up blowing it out a window.
 
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Old 02-26-16, 04:51 AM
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Why not just purchase a HEPA vacuum and be done with it. Not doing any good by putting the dust back into the air.
 
 

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