romex behind baseboard

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Old 09-29-14, 06:42 AM
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romex behind baseboard

So, the code says something like:
Drill the holes through the framing members so that the front edge of the holes are at least 1 1/4 inches in from the front edge of the framing members using the 3/8-inch drill/driver and a 1/2-inch spade bit. The National Electrical Code requires this minimal spacing to protect the cable from being damaged by nails or screws when the wall finish is installed.

If I cut notches into the stud and protect them with metal plates, that covers anything attempted to be nailed into the studs but what if someone tries to nail something in where there isn't a stud in future?
 
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Old 09-29-14, 06:47 AM
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Very poor plan, what do you think that's going to do to the studs strength?
Drill the holes or feed the wire from above or below along side of the studs.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 06:52 AM
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well...according to others on the forums it won;t affect the strength at all.
Lot's of DIY sites say you can cut notches in the stud without any problems?
 
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Old 09-29-14, 06:57 AM
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I'm not crazy about notching studs but unless the wall is poorly built or you notch out more than needed - I don't think it would be an issue. The odds aren't too great that someone would insert random nails in the base after it's installed. When installing base over wire you know the wire is there and should make an extra effort to make sure the nails all go into studs or bottom plate, after all a nail placed in air doesn't hold anything
 
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Old 09-29-14, 07:00 AM
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Is the romex supposed to be secured away from the finishing?
The finishing is wood panels in this case but could always be drywall in future.
I assume the nails used to attach the baseboard would never go through that and behind into the stud?
 
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Old 09-29-14, 07:08 AM
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Normally the base is secured thru the drywall into the framing but I forgot about you having a wood wall. Care would be needed to make sure you didn't use any long nails in between the studs unless you are shooting them into the bottom plate.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 07:14 AM
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You've mentioned notching before in different threads. How many studs are you notching ?
Are these open walls that are getting finished after the wiring.... if so... why the notching and not drilling ?

Running romex behind the baseboard is not ideal. You're running wire behind the baseboard for baseboard heaters. You need to use caution when attaching the heat as you don't necessarily attach the baseboard heaters to studs.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 07:19 AM
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How tall baseboard are you using. If speedbase or taller, why not surgically cut 4 or 5" of the paneling horizontally, remove it, drill the proper holes, install your wiring, replace the panel piece for spacing and install your base. No chance of an inadvertent nail penetrating the cable.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 08:02 AM
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Notched 3 studs only in a room about 8ft wide.
I wasn't able to take the panelling off (but that's what I should have done ) so instead I took the baseboard off and cut about a 2.5inch section of the panelling out of the bottom (baseboard will hide this when I put it back).
Then notched the studs to run the wire through.
Then put metal plates over the wire where the studs were.
Connected everything up and it all works.
However, now putting the 3 inch baseboard back - there is room to nail it at the bottom and top where it will not hit the romex but I guess there is the potential if anyone else did it. I read some thereads suggesting to secure the romex to the stud to actually push the cable further back.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 08:14 AM
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First, let's be realistic - if you notch the stud, you make it weaker. Period.

The real question is whether you've weakened it to the extent it matters and that's going to be based on what it supports and how much wood you removed.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 08:33 AM
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It supports about 8ft of the floor above + that sectrion of metal roof.
I cut about 2cm out of it.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 10:36 AM
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You've mentioned notching before in different threads. How many studs are you notching ?
Are these open walls that are getting finished after the wiring.... if so... why the notching and not drilling ?

Running romex behind the baseboard is not ideal. You're running wire behind the baseboard for baseboard heaters. You need to use caution when attaching the heat as you don't necessarily attach the baseboard heaters to studs.
It's a separate part of the wall. The wire to the thermostat goes along the baseboard on one wall whereas the wire to the heater goe son another wall.
So, the only thing I'm concerned about is nailing in the finished baseboards to the wood panelling. There are metal plates covering the wire in the notches so they are protected but the wire is very close to the panelling where it runs along from one stud to the next - probably not an issue but why does the code only apply to the wire in the stud and not to the wire that runs between the studs? If anything maybe I should staple the wire at the stud to move it backwards in the space until it reaches the next stud notch?

Next time I will remove the panels and use 3/4 holes.
 
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Old 09-29-14, 04:19 PM
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qwertyjjj,

Notching a stud will not effect the strength. There are rules for notching in the building code.
It is however, not a cure all and not the ideal way to run new cable. I've been following your posts and you're doing quite a bit of work.
Do yourself a favor. When running new cable, remove paneling or drywall. Drill center of stud, run cable. Replace paneling or drywall and you're done.

You probably don't have an attic or access to top of wall? This is the ideal way to run cable, up and down through stud cavities.
 
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Old 09-16-16, 07:28 AM
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From a structural integrity perspective, notching studs, per applicable building codes, does not weaken the structure.

The studs themselves don't actually support anything. It's the assemblage of studs and other frame members and any sheathing or siding spanning the centers of two or more wall cavities that do the actual supporting (above the foundation).

Any time you're dealing with a stable assembly, of any sort, the effects of modifying individual components must be considered in relation to the entire assembly. Assessing the effects of modifications to individual components alone will not yield valid information and may actually to dangerously erroneous information.

For a visual aid picture a generic midsize car driving through the wall of a generic ranch style house. If you drive the car through an area with a window in it little to no structural damage will occur as the load from the window was already supported by the overall assembly. A few completely missing studs won't matter.

But if you drive the same car through the same house but at a 45 degree angle to the same wall but miss the window the damage will be far more substantial. You've removed not only the studs hit by your car, you've effectively removed the window as well because you removed parts which shared the window load.

When you start talking about small notches and holes in studs you're not going to weaken the structure. You could make fairly big notches and holes if you wanted to and it wouldn't matter beyond violating building code.
 
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Old 09-16-16, 08:02 AM
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Welcome to the forums, Hat. Just to note, this is a two year old thread which has run its course.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 11:45 AM
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Yeah, I know it's an old thread but it crops up a lot in a wide range of searches. I thought I'd add some information for others who get here the same way.
 
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