Powerbridge Alternative

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-18-16, 03:35 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Powerbridge Alternative

I am installing a projector on the ceiling and hiring an electrician to install a new outlet is not feasible.

Anyway, after hours of research I learned about a product called a powerbridge that would let me add an outlet where I want and run romex wire in the ceiling. This system taps into an existing power outlet through a plug in. The price for the powerbridge is almost $90 (CAD).

Instead, I was going to build a similar system for a less money. Please advise if these are the right components I would need to safely make this happen:

Datacomm 45-0021-Wh Recessed Low Voltage Cable Plate with receptacle
Name:  Outlet.jpg
Views: 2125
Size:  13.8 KB

Leviton 5239 15 Amp, 125 Volt, Flanged Inlet Receptacle, Straight Blade
Name:  Inlet.jpg
Views: 1777
Size:  7.1 KB

C2G 18 AWG Outlet Saver Power Extension Cord (NEMA 5-15P to NEMA 5-15R)
Name:  Plug in.jpg
Views: 1710
Size:  9.6 KB

8-3 CU NMD-90 WHITE JKT W/G CSA 75M (romex)
Name:  Romes.jpg
Views: 1686
Size:  15.6 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-18-16, 04:22 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Not sure exactly what you are doing with all that periphery. You can't run an extension cord through a ceiling cavity. You will need to derive your power from either an existing receptacle or from the breaker panel using the appropriately sized cable for your circuit. ie. 14-2 wg nm b for 15 amp circuit, and 12-2 wg nm b for a 20 amp circuit. If you are running low voltage, or HDMI/cable at the same time, there are receptacle set ups that will accommodate that (such as the one you have pictured), as well as double boxes that will separate the line voltage from the low voltage.

I seriously don't know what you would use the 8-3 for that you have pictured. The male plug would have no place, nor would the short extension cord.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-16, 04:46 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Were you going to run the Romex from the inlet to the new receptacle and the short extension cord to connect the inlet to the existing receptacle? Not a good idea over priced and overly complicated. Just run the NM-b from the existing receptacle to the new receptacle. Fishing the NM-b in the wall is not usually hard.

If you are thinking of running the NM-b on the outside of the wall that is not allowed by code and extension cords by code are for temporary use only. I'm quoting NEC but CEC is similar.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-18-16 at 09:31 AM.
  #4  
Old 04-18-16, 07:09 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 67
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I know that many on the AVS forums use a power bridge. I never liked the idea. It just doesn't "feel" safe. Not sure under what exact circumstance a power bridge is intended/allowed to be used or if the items you show meet the same standards.

The pieces you show in your post would theoretically accomplish the task. HOWEVER, if it is safe, advisable or to "code" is another story.

What you plan to do essentially amounts to installing another proper receptacle. Why not just find a way to do it right and extend an existing receptacle (as ray2047 suggests)?
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-16, 11:11 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for your response folks. Let me just clarify a few things based on concerns you have raised.

1) I am not going to run any extension cords behind the walls. That is against code. What will be run behind the walls is romex house wire. on one end the romex will connect to the new receptacle I am installing by my projector and on the opposite end the romex will exit right next to an existing power outlet.

2)Just like Ray mentioned, the rommex will terminate via that black male inlet. Since the black male inlet will be installed just half a foot away from the existing outlet, I will connect the two using that short black extension cord with a male and female end.

3)Running an NM-b directly from an existing receptacle sounds like a reasonable option. My question is if I would need an electrician for this since it appears as though I am altering an existing circuit - whereas with my first solution the all the wiring was being left unaltered. Also, I will not be touching any possible live wires as the only possible contact I have with my existing wiring will be via a regular power outlet just the same way I hook up my toaster. I could even replace the feeder receptacle with a GFCI receptacle for good measure?

4)If there are any safety concerns regarding my proposed solution, please advise what could go wrong.
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-16, 12:15 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,408
Received 128 Votes on 119 Posts
Instead of creating your own 'power bridge', I would suggest learning how to correctly install a new receptacle. It's not that hard to do, and if you have the tools/knowledge to wire up a bridge like that, you can wire your own receptacle.

You'll have the benefit of it being wired right (and safely), and I'm sure you'll learn a bit along the way too
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-16, 12:19 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Just go to the existing receptacle. There is no need for the Powerbridge crap which just adds unneeded expense and uses a a questionable way to connecting to the existing receptacle. I can't say if you need to pull a permit. it is your decision and the rules of your local authority having jurisdiction. The wiring involved is so minor I imagine many wouldn't even ask.

To make running the NM-b easier you can remove the existing box from the wall and use the hole to fish the cable then replace the existing box with a deep old work box so your sure to have capacity for the new cable. If you already have two cables into the box then you will use pigtails to connect to the existing receptacle. That is all blacks to a pigtail, all whites to a pigtail, all grounds to a pigtail and the pigtails to the existing receptacle.

All of this assumes you have properly grounded receptacles and the existing receptacle is not on a switch. It will be easiest if both the existing and new receptacle are in the same stud bay.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-18-16 at 12:41 PM.
  #8  
Old 04-18-16, 12:59 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Unhappy

Thanks, Zordft and Ray2047. The more I think this through I realize that the Powerbridge is way more complicated than running romex directly to the old outlet, like you suggested. I will take the easier route and just hardwire a new receptacle.

I am passing by my county office to check if I need any permits - doubt it though.

Just a background, my 1978 home wasnt designed with audio visual in mind and my basement doesnt have the most convenient electrical layout. I would have to fish about 30 feet of romex between the basement ceiling and the the upper floor (popcorn and not panel). The closest power source I could drop the wire without drilling joist would be a light switch. I imagine the concept would be the same when drawing power from an existing lightswitch as it would be from a power outlet. Just pigtail the corresponding colors.
 
  #9  
Old 04-18-16, 01:27 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
The closest power source I could drop the wire without drilling joist would be a light switch. I imagine the concept would be the same when drawing power from an existing lightswitch as it would be from a power outlet.
In many older homes there is no usable power source at a switch. It is only the end of a switch loop. There is no neutral. If it does not have two or more white wires connected together it is a switch loop. If there is a black and white wire only and both are on the switch it is a switch loop. If it is a switch loop there is no neutral and therefore it can't be used as a power source.

Are there no receptacles in the room where the projector is going. If there are there are usually ways to use that receptacle as your power source without dry wall repair.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: