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Which Circuit least likely to trip breaker?: 5.7 amp AC & Fridge, or 9.7 amp AC

Which Circuit least likely to trip breaker?: 5.7 amp AC & Fridge, or 9.7 amp AC

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  #1  
Old 06-02-16, 01:47 PM
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Which Circuit least likely to trip breaker?: 5.7 amp AC & Fridge, or 9.7 amp AC

I am planning to run an xtra Air Conditioner now.

Which circuit should I put my computer on?,
Which circuit is least likely to trip a breaker?


1] Circuit #1 with Fridgidaire Air Conditioner: 5.7 amps,
& a Refrigerator: labelled "Full Load: 5.7 amps"

or

2] Circuit #2 with a 1984 Emerson Air Conditioner, 9.7 amps
 
  #2  
Old 06-02-16, 02:02 PM
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Are these 15a or 20a circuits? If 15a either is a crap shoot.
 
  #3  
Old 06-02-16, 02:18 PM
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My opinion is that circuit #1 is least likely to trip all other things being equal, but there are many unknown factors which could significantly sway the outcome.
 
  #4  
Old 06-02-16, 03:09 PM
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Those are 20 amp circuits in a 200amp panel w 4 active circuits...

Those are 20 amp circuits in a 200amp panel w 4 active circuits.

In my previous house the 1984 Emerson Air Conditioner, 9.7 amps at first would blow a 20 amp fuse [not a modern breaker] , until I changed to a slow-blow type fuse--- so I was more worried about that 9.7 amps possibly tripping a breaker.
QUESTION : Do breakers act like a slow-blow type fuse?
---------------------------------
QUESTION: ibpooks:Can you name a few of those unknown factors which could significantly sway the outcome?
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Here is my current setup based ibpooks suggestion"

Circuit # 1 “Kitch GFI”

Kitch Double Outlet [not GFI now! --replaced w reg switch] Microwave,KeyBd,Lamp

East Wall [North End] Double Outlet [Grounded,but Wired Backwards: Large Slot is Hot] :
Fridgidaire Air Conditioner: 5.7 amps,Refrigerator: Full Load: 5.7 amps
----------------------------------------------
East Wall [South End] Double Outlet: Top Outlet: Computer:moved 6-2-16;
Bottom Outlet: Power Strip: Monitor, Speakers; & > to Another Power Strip:Alarm Clock,Amp,2 lamps,Fan
-----------------------------------
Liv Rm, South End on the Outside of the BathRm : Double Outlet :Lamp,TV

_______________________________________
Circuit # 2 “Bath GFI”

South Wall [East End] [Grounded, Wired Correctly: Small Slot is Hot]: Quadruple Outlet> ;Printer ;
Power Strip: Pyle Amp,Ans Mach; Emerson Air Conditioner: 9.7 Amps
 
  #5  
Old 06-02-16, 03:22 PM
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As they are both 20A circuits, either seems OK with the anticipated loads.

Q1: Breakers with an "HACR" rating (most types of modern breakers have this) will act like a slow-blow fuse in response to a compressor motor starting up. They allow a large surge of current for a short period of time without tripping while the motor comes up to running speed.

Q2: The unknown factors are the startup profile of the AC units, example old or poorly maintained units draw more current. The ampacity and lengths of the circuits.

The lack of GFCI protection in the kitchen and the incorrect polarity of the circuits should be fixed first as these are safety problems.

Note that if your printer is a laser printer, these can draw a large amount of current during warm up and printing for the heating element in the fuser.
 
  #6  
Old 06-02-16, 04:34 PM
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Thanks, ibpooks! ----Very Helpful & Clear!
 
  #7  
Old 06-03-16, 12:24 PM
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The refrigerator rarely runs. The only issue would be if both the AC and refrigerator cycled on at the same time.
 
  #8  
Old 06-03-16, 12:59 PM
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The main risk being on the refrigerator circuit would be if the breaker tripped because both tried to start at the same time and you weren't home to reset it. Then you have a warm room and a warm refrigerator if you are gone long.
 
 

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