Wiring 100-amp sub-panel for 1hp pool pump and heater

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Old 06-07-16, 05:57 PM
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Question Wiring 100-amp sub-panel for 1hp pool pump and heater

The project is to wire a 125-amp sub-panel from the main, approx. 50 feet away to serve a 220v in-ground 1hp pool pump, heat pump, and 120v LED pool light.

Wondering if the following plan will suffice;

- Exit the main panel with a 2 pole 220-volt, 125-amp breaker.
- Run 50-feet of #2 aluminum triplex, and #8 insulated ground to the sub-panel location.
- Install 125-amp main breaker in sub-panel.
- Install 60-amp 2 pole, 220v GFI breaker serving pool pump; #6 wire.
- Install 40-amp 2 pole, 220v GFI breaker serving heat pump; #8 wire.
- Install 15-amp breaker serving GFI protected 120v for LED pool light; #12 wire.

Specific questions;

1. Can I direct bury the wire, and then enclose in PVC conduit where it goes above ground to enter the panels?
2. Will the #2 aluminum triplex, with a #8 insulated ground suffice?
3. Confirming that in the sub-panel, I DO NOT need to bond the neutral and equipment ground.
4. Is there likely a better way of going about this?
 
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Old 06-07-16, 09:26 PM
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4. Is there likely a better way of going about this?
You really need quadplex not triplex. Mobile home cable would be best because it does come with the insulated ground required for a pool. Example: Mobile Home Feeder Cable UNDERGROUND SERVICE ENTRANCE CABLE
I DO NOT need to bond the neutral and equipment ground.
That is correct. Bonded ground bar and isolated neutral bar. You will also need a ground rod for the panel.

I'd suggest a 100 amp main break panel kit as the cheapest way to go. When you add in the included branch circuit breakers and due to the larger number sold it will be cheaper than a 125 amp panel. You will need to buy and install a ground bar.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 10:01 PM
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Hi, thanks for your reply. Take a look at electrical - Wiring 100-amp sub-panel for 1hp pool pump and heater - Home Improvement Stack Exchange

What are your thoughts on the feedback provided in the main answer? Also, regarding the grounding grid?
 
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Old 06-07-16, 11:11 PM
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Not a pool pro. Wait for comments from the pro electricians. They are correct on the other site that aluminum is not good for 100 (75 column) but you can use a 90 amp breaker. If no 90 amp breaker made for your panel you are allowed to round up to 100.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 11:26 PM
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Okay, thanks.

Also, something else that doesn't seem to make much sense, is the actual need for a 100 amp service to run a pool pump and heat pump.. Seems over kill, does it not?

It's a 1hp pool pump, made by Raypak -- all I know so far.

I found Raypak Residential Pool /Spa Heaters - Professional Pool Pump, PS165VSP, which is a 1.65hp pump.. and it says 11 amps..
 
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Old 06-08-16, 01:22 AM
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Originally you wrote:
Install 60-amp 2 pole, 220v GFI breaker serving pool pump; #6 wire.
But you now write:
I found Raypak Residential Pool /Spa Heaters - Professional Pool Pump, PS165VSP, which is a 1.65hp pump.. and it says 11 amps
The amperage sounds right and would require no more than a 20 amp breaker. Looking at the heat pumps I see amps from 18a for the smallest to 30 amps for the largest. Who provided you with the amp requirements in your first post.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 06:45 AM
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You can skip the main breaker in the sub panel,only required where the circuit gets its feed,definetly get the exact ratings for the equipment,also not a bad idea to run your plan by the AHJ,they all interpret things differently.
I might consider using all PVC,doesn't need to be buried as deep you can oversize it a bit and use individual conductors.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 08:51 AM
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So I got some more information from the pool place, the pump is a Waterway Champion pump; I called that mfg, and they said the 1hp pump draws 7.1 amp at 230v.

The heater is an Aqua Comfort 1100 Heat Pump; haven't had any luck getting ahold of anyone in their office.

The light is a Savi LED Light.

Either way, the 100amp still seems overkill at this point, yeah?
 
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Old 06-08-16, 09:23 AM
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Recommended breaker size fo an Aqua Comfort 1100 Heat Pump 30 amps (XL Series | AquaComfort). So you need two 15 amp breakers, one for the pump, and one for the light and a 30amp breaker for the heater. A 60 amp main lug breaker panel (or a 100 amp main breaker panel to give room for more circuits later) on #6 copper wire should be enough. You would need two black one white #6 THWN (copper) and one #10 green THWN in 1" PVC conduit (or 1" to allow for future upgrades) buried 18". Breaker at the house will be a 60amp GFCI breaker or you can use a regular breaker and GFCI individual breakers in the subpanel. The latter would be a bit more expensive but more convenient should you trip a breaker GFCI function.

So where did your original information come from? If from the installer you need to find out why they gave you such strange information.

I'd suggest just install a 100 amp main breaker panel and 1" conduit and no wire or breaker in the house panel. Then you can install what you need when the pool work is done. I'd totally forget using aluminum quadplex and just use copper THWN individual wires.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 06-08-16 at 09:43 AM.
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Old 06-08-16, 09:34 AM
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Thanks, yeah that sounds like a far better plan. The installer said they usually just blanket a 100amp circuit for all of the pools. I thought that was odd as well, which is why I pushed to get the actual pump info. Even the pump mfg said they usually blanket a 50amp circuit for the pump... but, he literally said the pump is 7.1 amp.. so.. yeah, I'm not sure.

Let's talk a bit about the equipotential bonding grid.. does this need to be bonded to the electrical circuit ground as well, or isolated?
 
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Old 06-08-16, 09:46 AM
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Please read my edited post above.
Let's talk a bit about the equipotential bonding grid
You will have to wait for the pros to comment on that.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 12:48 PM
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The bonding grid does not need to directly connect to any of the equipment grounds; however practically speaking they will interconnect. For example, the pump should have a bonding lug on the metal chassis that will connect to the bonding grid. The pump will also have an equipment ground lug in the wiring compartment where the circuit ground will connect. The same situation will likely occur with the heater or if you have any metal conduits serving pool loads.

Quad-plex or any other flexible cable is not permitted for a pool panel feeder. This feeder must be individual conductors in PVC or metal conduit buried at the appropriate depth for the conduit type. Copper or aluminum is allowed here, but the equipment ground must be insulated and marked with green.

Equipment grounds that originate from the pool panel and go to pool equipment must be copper, insulated green, and no smaller than #12.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 02:32 PM
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The pool water must also be bonded,I would expect the pool co. would install that fitting.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 02:34 PM
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Hi,

I did speak with the pool company and they confirmed that they run the bonding grid in the concrete, and connect the walls. So, all that would be needed is to affix the bonding to the pump, heater, and panel I suppose.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 03:01 PM
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So this is what the final wiring plan would look like, yeah?

Of course each piece of equipment would have the associated L1, L2, N, and G. Is it going to cause any unbalance running the single 120v on L1?

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Old 06-08-16, 03:25 PM
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Is it going to cause any unbalance running the single 120v on L1?
A little unbalance is normal and is not a problem.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 04:35 PM
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Okay, great. Other than that, does the schematic look appropriate and like a decent plan forward? Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 06-08-16, 06:16 PM
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There will be two hots from each of the 240v breakers. You diagram doesn't seem to show that. In addition there will be a ground wire with the 240 wires. For the 120v load there will be a hot, neutral, ground wire.

If the breaker at the house is not GFCI then each of the breakers in the subpanel should be GFCI.
 
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Old 06-09-16, 07:06 AM
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Yes that diagram looks good.
 
 

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