Need to know if my portable AC is powered safely

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  #1  
Old 06-22-16, 11:53 PM
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Need to know if my portable AC is powered safely

I live in a room outside the main house, a guest room with no available plugs other than a extension cord power my computer/laptop and simple light.
Its the summer now and I just bought this portable ac
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Honeywell MN10CESWW 10,000 BTU Portable Air Conditioner with Remote Control

The thing is I dont have a plug, but I can connect a 50ft extension cord to have it powered by itself which is this one
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
US Wire 74100 12/3 100-Feet SJTW Yellow Heavy-Duty Lighted Extension Cord
With this safely power it without risking it catching on fire or short circuiting?
The guy said at the store if I use this heavt duty cord it would be safe because its heavy duty but I wanted to see if someone can confirm this online here or offer there advice.
 
  #2  
Old 06-22-16, 11:57 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Will that extension cord safely power that A/C ..... yes.
Is is a proper way to connect an A/C..... no.

Extension cords are for temporary use. An A/C is not considered a temporary use.
 
  #3  
Old 06-23-16, 04:09 AM
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I agree with Pete. While the heavy duty extension cord can handle the current, it's never wise to leave an extension cord running across grass (long term). It's very possible that the cord can be damaged by an animal chewing through the insulation or accidentally being run over by a lawn mower. The proper way to handle this is to dig a trench and bury either outdoor electrical cable or regular electrical cable encased in plastic conduit (recommended).

See *link removed*


Mod Note: You can not use "regular electrical cable encased in plastic conduit". It must be outdoor direct burial cable even if in conduit. All conduit eventually fills with water and therefore is considered a wet location. NM-b (AKA Romex) can not be used in a wet location.
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 06-23-16 at 06:11 AM. Reason: Add Mod Note because of bad advice in the post. Link removed
  #4  
Old 06-23-16, 04:54 AM
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Bob, the terms outdoor cable and regular cable are without definitive meaning. For direct burial the cable needs to be marked type UF (underground feeder) and type NM (non-metallic, aka Romex or "indoor" cable can NEVER be used outside, even when encased in a continuous PVC conduit. ANY conduit, of any material, used outside is by definition a damp or wet space and thereby requires water resistant wiring.

Also, that DIY Network article that you linked to is quite poor. ALL receptacles outside (except certain higher voltage circuits) need GFCI protection and also "bubble" style in-use covers. These code provisions have been in place for many years, maybe even a full decade.
 
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Old 06-23-16, 06:58 AM
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If there's only one outlet in a whole room I'd be betting it's an older house that's possible way under powered.
It was common long ago to run all the outlets for the whole house on one circuit and only have 14-2 wires.
A unit that size should have it's own 20 amp. circuit back to the panel.
I've been to a few fires where people have done what your suggesting and the wires where burned all the way back to the panel from over loading.
 
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Old 06-23-16, 08:00 AM
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If it is really old the receptacle is probably fed from the junction box of the ceiling light. Those boxes are often filled by wires with deteriorating insulation. Add to that the heat from years of incandescent bulbs cooking that insulation they are a fire waiting to happen.

I agree with Joe. You need to run a new dedicated circuit just for the A/C.
 
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Old 06-23-16, 08:02 AM
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Moved to the Electrical forum because this is an electrical issue not an A/C issue.
 
 

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