New wiring and switch for waste disposer

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  #1  
Old 07-02-16, 03:05 PM
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New wiring and switch for waste disposer

Hi. I'm wiring for a sink waste disposer. I'm installing a new switchbox feeding from a receptacle I already have. That switch would feed a box with sockets below, that would come out from behind the cabinetry. I have a few questions.

1. The current socket junction box that I will use is already 25 inches from the sink. The location of the new switchbox would be closer to the sink, at 18 inches. Is that to code? Or should I put the switchbox on the other side so it's further away from the sink?

2. The socket/junction box I'm tapping power from has on of those integrated breaker for use near a water source. If I wire the switchbox to the main leads, then it will circumvent the breaker and the only breaker on the same line as the waste disposer will be to the main breaker box outside. Is that OK, or should I wire the switch box to the inline reset breaker/socket set? The waster disposer pulls 9.5 amps apparently, so if I wire to that I have to make sure it will not trigger the reset. That's why I'm trying to decided where to wire to.

3. I'm using Romex SIMpull indoor wire/copper NM-B Cable to go between boxes. I could easily put a socket coming out from behind the cabinetry OR I could just as easily wire from the switch straight to the waste disposer with that wire and not worry about the box below as I don't really need to plug anything else but the disposer down there.

Anything else I'm missing? Please advise.
 
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Old 07-02-16, 04:22 PM
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You can run a new cable from the GFCI to the switchbox or the sink base cabinet. Use the GFCI load terminals, which means the disposer and switch will be protected.

This disposer should really be on a dedicated circuit if you want to consider that.
 
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Old 07-02-16, 04:26 PM
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The disposal cannot be feed from the receptacle circuit serving the counter top receptacles.

The receptacles that you are talking about does not have an internal breaker. Those are TEST and RESET buttons for the gfi function. It does not trip on overload.
 
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Old 07-02-16, 11:30 PM
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I think I understand what you are saying. Let me point out though that I'm not plugging into the front of the receptacle, I'm talking about new wiring behind the receptacle circuit, but in series either before or after the GFCI.

Also please see the reply to the other comment below...
 
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Old 07-02-16, 11:34 PM
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I'm not sure if this contradicts the other guys' comment... Maybe. But what you say is more or less what I had in mind.

I don't have another circuit close by. I could tap into the one for the fridge, which is somewhat nearby, further but doable. Regardless, if the GFCI is not an actual breaker for overload (which I never thought it was - I've always thought it's there because of the nearby water source), if I overload the circuit, it'll trip outside at the breaker box. I have to check how much amperage I have on tap. I believe I'll need at the very least 15 amps. 10 amps would be way too close to the disposer's 9.5 amp draw.
 
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Old 07-02-16, 11:42 PM
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The waste disposer should usually be on its own circuit* so you can't use and existing circuit. The refrigerator would be part of the SABC (Small Appliance Branch Circuit) and could not be used for the waste disposal.

Bottom line is you need to run a new circuit.

*If the the disposal amperage is more then 50% of circuit capacity or if recommended by manufacturer it must be on its own circuit even if the circuit you want to use isn't restricted.
2011 NEC 210.23(A)(2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-03-16 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 07-03-16, 01:38 AM
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Thanks. Wow. I wasn't expecting that. I guess I'm going to have to run a new circuit. I might need an actual electrician for that. I can wire things, run short wiring runs, etc. But if I have to install a whole other breaker outside, to run new wires across the house in order to connect the waste disposer, I might need somebody to run those for me.

This is a pretty nice house, but it's older and way out in the sticks... I don't think everything has been done to code, but a lot of it has. Regardless, everything I DO I would like done to code regardless of what was done before me.
 
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Old 07-03-16, 11:06 AM
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run new wires across the house
Or you can run conduit fastened to the outside of the house or buried till it gets to the kitchen wall..
 
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Old 07-05-16, 11:48 PM
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It wouldn't be the hardest thing to run wire from the breaker box, under the house (crawl space and basement) and to the kitchen wall. It just complicated the project a little bit. I'm more on the fence about the fact that we have a septic tank and I didn't want the disposer in the first place... makes the inspiration to work on it even harder. Haha.
 
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Old 07-06-16, 12:48 AM
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I agree.... a disposer and septic system don't belong together.
 
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Old 07-06-16, 04:58 AM
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Be prepared to pump the tank frequently. I don't think that too many would recommend a disposal with a tank.
 
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Old 07-06-16, 09:32 AM
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Agreed. I don't want the disposer. My dad came to visit and insisted on one. My wife obliged. So he bought it and I helped him install it.

They agreed they would use it only for scraps here and there. Most everything would go in the trash.
 
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Old 07-06-16, 09:36 AM
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I 100% agree with you. I don't want the darn thing. Please see my comment to the other reply above.
 
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