DIY power relocation kit from box store?


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Old 07-30-16, 02:58 PM
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DIY power relocation kit from box store?

So I found these kits online that make it pretty easy to relocate power and A/V up a wall for mounting a flat screen. I think the price is a bit steep though for what you get.

Wondering if any experts can say with confidence that I could make one of these myself with parts from the local home store (and save money of course), as well as keep everything within electrical code?

https://www.amazon.com/Midlite-22APJ...relocation+kit

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 07-30-16, 03:07 PM
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Do you have power in the SAME exact bay in which your TV will be mounted ?
You can come out of a receptacle to feed an additional one behind the TV.

I use this exact kit.... all the time. It's just the box and plate. The receptacle and jacks are extra.
https://www.amazon.com/Arlington-TVB.../dp/B003E48COU
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At the bottom you cut in a low voltage trim ring with a decora cover. I don't use jack plates. I run my A/V cables thru the wall.

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Old 07-30-16, 03:26 PM
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You can easily just fish a receptacle up the wall, using the proper cable of course, and install a recessed duplex receptacle for the TV. Then just install a couple of low voltage rings for the low voltage as PJmax said. The home stores should also carry a a few low voltage plates if you want a cleaner look. Material costs would be about $20-$25.
 
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Old 07-30-16, 04:23 PM
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Thanks guys, but to clarify, I do not have power located directly below where the outlet would need to go. The outlets are left and right by about 4-5 feet. I'm trying to avoid having to come up from the basement for an outlet as it's on an outside wall and not easily accessible for drilling.
 
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Old 07-30-16, 05:46 PM
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It looks this kit from Arlington may be more what you are looking for. It appears to be used with customer supplied NM-b cable.

Arlington-TVBR2505K-Organizer-Recessed-Solution
 
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Old 07-30-16, 06:20 PM
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I do not have power located directly below where the outlet would need to go. The outlets are left and right by about 4-5 feet.
You could use surface raceway such as Wire mold to bring it to the correct stud bay. It can be painted to match the wall and if you have furniture on the wall it mostly won't be seen.

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Old 07-30-16, 07:24 PM
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Thanks PJ, I like this option. Are the wires just being spliced in that bottom gang box then?
 
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Old 07-30-16, 09:52 PM
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Since it's made by Arlington.... it's a good product. There should be a secure method of attaching the wiring included.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 09:26 AM
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In my opinion, I'd skip the recessed box and go with a standard up top by the TV. Some cable boxes or other devices (ie: Chromecast, Amazon Fire stick, etc) use a 'wall wart' plug for power, and will sometimes not fit if the receptacle is recessed.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 12:30 PM
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The biggest issue is to make sure you use a wiring method that is rated for use inside a wall, such as NM-B romex cable. Extension cord, appliance cord, zip cord and similar methods cannot be used inside walls.
 
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Old 08-03-16, 06:44 AM
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Please tell me that doesn't apply to low voltage wiring.
 
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Old 08-03-16, 08:47 AM
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Please tell me that doesn't apply to low voltage wiring.
Sorry, but it does.
----------------------------
 
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Old 08-03-16, 12:04 PM
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Low voltage cables need to have a CMP, CATV, CL2 or CL3 rating to be used inside walls. They need to have a *P or rating for use in an air handling space (plenum). There are several variations on class 2 and class 3 ratings, but in residential use any of the variations should be OK.

Cables that do not comply are things like speaker zip cord or automotive "primary" wire.
 
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Old 08-04-16, 06:19 AM
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So all those kits pictured previously...and pretty much every home theater install that conceals the RF, DC and speaker wires are all a code violation?
 
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Old 08-04-16, 07:05 AM
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The kit shown in post 1 does not include the LV cables. It would be up to the installer to supply the proper cables. I am sure many end up with improper cables in the wall.
 
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Old 08-04-16, 11:06 AM
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Virtually all speaker cable that has an overall sheath carries at least class 2 rating. The kind that is prohibited is the moulded pair with one silver and one gold colored conductor. Any of the "in wall" cables from vendors like Monoprice carry a class 2 or higher rating. One exception is video cables where the in wall versions usually cost more so people may not purchase those. I think a more common violation is using non-plenum comm cable in air handling space (such as above drop ceilings) as the plenum version of cabling is usually quite a bit more expensive.
 
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Old 08-04-16, 11:29 AM
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So all those kits pictured previously...and pretty much every home theater install that conceals the RF, DC and speaker wires are all a code violation?
They used to make a kit that had two wall plates with holes, and a tube that would connect them behind the wall. You would run your cables from your devices below to the TV above through the tube. Cables didn't have to be 'in wall rated' through that tube.

Chances are, your HDMI cables are in-wall rated. You might want to check your other cables too.

If this was my personal house, I'd do the electrical correctly (ie: proper receptacle wired up for the TV), but I'd bend on the code for the low voltage AV stuff. There's really no additional fire risk, and I don't know about elsewhere but low voltage seems to be off the inspector's radar. I'd get a couple of those brushed cover plates and call it a day. But again, it's my house.

If you want to do it by the book, check out monoprice.com . They are well known for good cables and good prices.
 
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Old 08-05-16, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by pcboss
The kit shown in post 1 does not include the LV cables. It would be up to the installer to supply the proper cables. I am sure many end up with improper cables in the wall.
Then I'm going to assume that what appears to be a pre-wired in-wall 120V extension made with flexible cable is made with compliant wire. It might be romex but it's coiled pretty tight for solid cable.
Does it HAVE to be stamped with something to be sold in the US?

 
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Old 08-05-16, 06:41 AM
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Any electrical parts are required to be listed by a recognized listing agency, many cases UL (Underwriters Laboratory).
 
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Old 08-05-16, 09:11 AM
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Solid wire is sold coiled all the time.

Cables and cords should be marked at regular intervals with the type and size.
 
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Old 08-05-16, 10:11 AM
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Even if that is NM-b to connect the two devices the picture in post 18 shows what is technically an extension cord to connect the right hand device to a nearby receptacle. NEC says extension cords are for temporary use only. I wonder if the extension cord is even #14?
 
 

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