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What is this called and what are some common applications for it?

What is this called and what are some common applications for it?


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Old 08-15-16, 05:57 AM
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What is this called and what are some common applications for it?

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I found this do-hickey somewhere and from what I can tell, it allows for "tapping" into an existing hot wire. Is this correct? What is this thing-a-ma-bob called? What are common application?
Thanks!
 
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Old 08-15-16, 06:37 AM
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Identification

What is it called by the U.S. Patent Office? That's where the diagram came from.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 06:37 AM
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Many plug ends use this method to attach the male or female to lamp cord. It's also used in automotive applications to tap off exiting power line. I don't know for sure but I don't think it can be used for any large or high voltage applications.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 06:44 AM
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Not all patents are a good idea...
 
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Old 08-15-16, 06:48 AM
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It's called a Tap Splice Connector.
They are used on things like Utility Trailer wiring.
That particular connecter is a tee, and rather than used to connect two wires, it allows you to pull power off a cord without cutting it.

I wouldn't recommend them.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 07:11 AM
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They also make those for much larger conductors. Buchanan makes them IIRC.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 08:17 AM
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They're used all the time in low voltage Malibu landscape lighting to connect the light post to the buried cord.

 
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Old 08-15-16, 12:05 PM
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Scothlocks is a very common name for them. Unreliable as heck in automotive use.

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Old 08-15-16, 04:25 PM
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You could search for "insulation displacing connector".
 
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Old 08-16-16, 06:33 AM
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The US Patent Office calls it an Electrical Cable Connector and goes on to define it as "a connector assembly for effecting electrical circuit connection between insulated wires without removing the insulation therefrom including two identical insulated unitary housing members capable of being coaxially interfitted to define a central passage chamber for a dual conductor cable; each housing member carrying a plate terminal formed with an elongated central opening receptive of a single wire conductor and having a sharp prong protruding from one side thereof for penetrating the insulation of the cable and contacting one wire conductor thereof when the housing members are interfitted; each of the plate terminals operating to penetrate the insulation of an associated single wire conductor to establish circuit connection therewith."

By the way, the above paragraph rates 22.5 when examined with the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level test. This test rates text on a U.S. school grade level. For example, a score of 8.0 means that an eighth grader can understand the document. I have no clue what grade a 22.5 score would represent. Reading it made my head spin, but then again I ain't too bright.

Thanks for all of your responses. I now know one thing more than I knew yesterday. That's important when you get to my age because for every new thing I learn in a day, I forget two things I knew the day before.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 06:46 AM
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I now know one thing more than I knew yesterday. That's important when you get to my age because for every new thing I learn in a day, I forget two things I knew the day before.
Welcome to the geriatric group. And one thing more...

Oh never mind, I forgot.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 09:11 AM
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The application describes this device as being more universal than older designs. I find the "one size fits all" idea very troubling. Horizontally-opposed piercing conductors should definitely only be used on a limited range of wire sizes. Imagine squeezing this onto a 20-gauge zip cord with thin insulation. Direct short. And just how would you use this gizmo on a "multi-conductor cable" as described in the text?

SMH
 
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Old 08-16-16, 12:55 PM
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Lawyers write patent specifications and claims to be as broad as possible so the patent cannot be easily circumvented by a competitor with a trivial design tweak and so the patent will apply to as many industries or applications as possible. For example in this case the description would allow this device to work in the heavy power transmission industry with massive cables all the way down to tiny computer network cables. This gives the patent assignee the greatest flexibility to assert their intellectual property rights. The patented device doesn't actually have to work or be practical, just novel and thoroughly described. The patent office is filled with all sorts of crazy stuff like free energy machines that can't possibly work, but are patented nonetheless.
 
 

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