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How to 'break out' multiple circuits in a single conduit??

How to 'break out' multiple circuits in a single conduit??

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  #1  
Old 10-05-16, 11:22 PM
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How to 'break out' multiple circuits in a single conduit??

I'm running 3 20 amp circuits in a single 1/2'' EMT conduit.

What is the best way to 'break out' the circuits from single conduit into 3 separate conduits that will then be connected to outlets?

My current plan is to run the 1/2'' conduit into a junction box and simply pull each circuit through a separate exit point on the junction box and then have each circuit continue individually an outlet.

Is this an acceptable way of achieving the above?

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-06-16, 07:53 PM
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If you are using EMT, it is continuous and assembled with the proper fittings, you do not need a grounding conductor. You can use one if you choose.

For me, it will depend on how I run the conduit. Most cases I just run the conduit to the first outlet box and drop one circuit, then run to the next box and drop circuit 2, and so on. Example:
-------[1]--------[2]--------[3]

However, your method is OK too. Whatever works beast for your project.
 
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Old 10-06-16, 08:33 PM
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Thank you very much for the replies.

Is there any negative to running a separate ground for each circuit?

The reason I ask is that I've purchased stranded 12 gauge wire for the project and I don't mind running the extra grounds if it won't cause a problem.

Thanks again for your insight.
 
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Old 10-06-16, 08:55 PM
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You're only allowed by code to put ten #12's in a 1/2" conduit.

Figuring three wires per circuit would give you nine conductors.
The only problem is that the grounds get connected together and to the box.
You're going to wind up with a lot of unnecessary ground wire.

It would be beneficial to keep it to one common ground thru the run.
 
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Old 10-07-16, 04:19 PM
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According to my, book you can only get 9 #12 THHN wires in 1/2" EMT.
 
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Old 10-07-16, 04:37 PM
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I know...there's always a discrepancy.
My one book shows 10 and the other shows 9 in EMT with 10 in IMC. Go figure.
 
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Old 10-07-16, 05:24 PM
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My book is the NEC tables in the back. It shows 10 for 1/2" IMC. Humm.

We could do it the long way:
EMT area for more then two wires (40%) = .122 inches
IMC area for more then two wires (40%) = .137 inches
Area of one #12 THHN wire = .0133
9 x .0133 = .1197
10 x .0133 = .133

The math checks out.
 
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