red wire!?

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-06-17, 04:47 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: usa
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
red wire!?

I'll try to make this short, but still have all the information. Just inside our front door of our 1986 house is a panel of three switches. One is for a single plug, one is for an outside lamp, and the third is odd. It's like a master switch, that will control all of the plugs in the front living room, as well as the overhead power over dining room, and one switch in the kitchen, which previously powered the stove exhaust fan (but none of the other outlets or switches in the kitchen). That wiring for the exhaust fan was wired directly to the fan, not to a plug. I'm remodeling our kitchen, which is actually replacing everything, but keeping it in the same place. The wiring that was previously for the exhaust fan, I'm planning to use to now power the above stove microwave, which also handles exhaust. I got an outlet to attach to those wires, since the microwave unit has a plug, but don't know what to do with these wires in the picture. Any help would be greatly appreciated, my wife would be quite excited and surprised to be able to have this installed and working tonight! Thanks so much!Name:  IMG_20170106_163643.jpg
Views: 253
Size:  21.7 KB
 
  #2  
Old 01-06-17, 04:50 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 75 Votes on 68 Posts
I tried to read this twice and still does not make any sense, Front door how than did we get to kitchen???
 
  #3  
Old 01-06-17, 04:54 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,725
Received 1,316 Votes on 1,216 Posts
Don't cut the red wire !

Not sure what that wiring in the picture is. Is that where the old exhaust fan was connected?

The red would signify a switched hot. Something connected to red and white would be switched and that same item connected to white and black would be always live.

Be advised that by code a combination microwave/exhaust fan requires its own 20A dedicated circuit due to its high current demand.
 
  #4  
Old 01-06-17, 05:07 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: usa
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I know, it's weird. Basically, that switch by the front door controls multiple power access points, this set of wires being one of those. Also, there's another switch on the wall in the kitchen, that controlled the fan that was attached to these wires. I was planning to just leave that switch turned on at all times, since it the unit would have it's own fan/light as part of it. Does that make more sense?
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-17, 05:10 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: usa
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, these wires were connected to the fan. Is there a way to check if it's already 20A? Maybe it was when they built the house, and the previous owner had different options when they picked the old oven? The old unit had a high up small oven, but it was all powered by the 220 plug along with the lower oven.
 
  #6  
Old 01-06-17, 05:18 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: usa
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Also, don't know if this makes a difference, but the instructions for the unit's electrical requirements says "a 120 volt, 60 Hz, AC only, 15- or 20-amp electrical supply with a fuse or circuit breaker."
 
  #7  
Old 01-06-17, 07:22 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,215
Received 103 Votes on 89 Posts
The requirements are for a standard circuit.

You would need to determine the wire gauge to see if a 20 amp breaker can be used.
 
  #8  
Old 01-06-17, 08:01 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As Pete said, the new microwave hood requires a dedicated circuit.

It looks like this wiring is a 15amp lighting circuit, already in use, and the new hood will trip the breaker.
That said, I'm curious why a 3-conductor cable was ran to the old vent hood, that's unusual.

As a test, I would use a meter and see if the voltage between red and black is 240V.
 
  #9  
Old 01-06-17, 10:13 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: usa
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks everyone! It looks like this has advanced past my abilities. And, like working with gas, I'm only willing to mess with electrical in ways that I'm comfortable with. Time to call an electrician, thanks so much for the input!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: