Cook top installation question


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Old 01-09-17, 09:00 AM
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Cook top installation question

I have a new electric cook top that i'm installing. It calls for a 40A breaker (which I have as well as AWG 8 wire). My question is whether or not to use just a regular junction box to connect the romex to the cook top wire, or if I should use the junction boxes with the shut off on them. I looked and did find a junction box with a shut off on it but it needed two twist in old style fuses and was rated for 30A. Also I haven't seemed to be able to find a 40A twist in fuse. I think once you go to 40A you need the cylinder type fuses. Any help would be much appreciated.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 09:50 AM
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Not sure about Canada, but a cook top only requires the breaker at the main panel, not an additional disconnect at the location.

A typical cook top has a 1/2" flex whip and has 2 hot wires and a bare ground.

- Some cooktops have 2 hot wires, neutral, and ground.

Either way, connect all wires and connect the bare ground from the house to the metal junction box and to the bare wire in the appliance whip.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 09:54 AM
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The NEC requires a disconnect for cooktops unless the circuit breaker is within sight or the circuit breaker is equipped with a locking device.

But I have to say I have never seen a local disconnect installed for a hardwired cooktop. Every one I have seen just hard wires to a junction box.

If you want to or need to meet the letter of the NEC, the easiest way would be to buy a circuit breaker locking device and install it on the breaker. They are under $10.

If you want a local disconnect, I'd probably use a pull out disconnect typically used for Air conditioner outside units. They are available non-fused. Example: GE 60 Amp 240-Volt Non-Fuse Metallic AC Disconnect-TFN60RCP - The Home Depot

Also quite inexpensive.

Good luck with your project!
 
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Old 01-09-17, 11:06 AM
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Watch out for aluminum wire. Cook top circuits are often pulled with aluminum wires and you cannot directly join copper to aluminum. In this case use a disconnect box which is rated for both. If both sides are copper, large wirenuts are OK.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 11:41 AM
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Thanks for all the good intel! It's very much appreciated. I'll probably use the disconnect box just to be safe.
 
 

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