Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Electrical - AC & DC
Reload this Page >

Use of an appliance trips a breaker that is not the circuit of use

Use of an appliance trips a breaker that is not the circuit of use


  #1  
Old 02-21-17, 09:04 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Use of an appliance trips a breaker that is not the circuit of use

My home is two years old. I have lived in the home one year and am out of builder warranty. When I use my refrigerator water dispenser, the arc fault breaker for the overhead lighting and other electrical sockets for the living room and study trips. The refrigerator circuit breaker does not trip nor any other kitchen circuit. This is completely random and is not duplicated easily for diagnosis purpose. Failure rate is the the single digit percentile. The only thing I have done is remove and reinstall face plates in a room on the affected circuit for painting. No paint has entered any of the electric. The failure happened with and without the faceplates installed for what its worth. The load on the failing circuit is small (new TV, computer router, cfl lighting on dimmer switches) How can the use of one circuit create a failure of another?


Update:

After testing the gfci switch that the fridge outlet is supposedly tied to, the fridge does not shut down. The gfci outlet does though. Does that mean the fridge is not tied to the gfci? The outlet the fridge is dedicated to is not gfci. The 15 amp GAFCI breaker that trips is directly across from the kitchen circuit with the fridge (20 amp non CAFCI type) in the breaker box.

Thanks

Thanks in advance.
 

Last edited by tippin; 02-21-17 at 10:04 AM.
  #2  
Old 02-21-17, 09:09 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 8,161
Received 77 Upvotes on 70 Posts
For a while plug ref.into another outlet. If you have another gfci one you can use try that one If not just plug into one close not on GFCI outlet. Trying to find out it GFCI is bad or problem in ref.
 
  #3  
Old 02-21-17, 09:28 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks Pugsi. I did have to go back and edit a word in my post. I don't know if this makes a real difference (I'm no electrician obviously) but its an arc fault breaker in the box and the light illuminated is for the arc. I will use an extension cord to use another outlet and test the scenario . FWIW there are two gfci outlets in the kitchen. I need to check if they are on the same circuit or separate. I do understand where you are going with the gfci.

Thanks for your help .
 
  #4  
Old 02-21-17, 09:33 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 9,785
Upvotes: 0
Received 45 Upvotes on 43 Posts
The first step when troubleshooting AFCI problems like this is to replace the troublesome AFCI breaker. They can fail in unusual ways. They are sensitive to interference on the electrical line which is filtered out in properly working breakers. Many brands will do so under warranty if you call the manufacturer's 1-800 number.
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-17, 09:52 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the tip on the breaker warranty!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: