Daisy chain off an existing daisy chain?

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Old 03-23-17, 12:52 PM
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Daisy chain off an existing daisy chain?

Hopefully, the title isn't too misleading, but I suspect I can't do what I want to do, so I'd like to know how to do it correctly. I currently have a GFCI in my kitchen. It is already being daisy chained. But I would like to add another outlet in the kitchen, about four feet away from this particular outlet.

So I presume I can't add two "outlet" electrical lines into the load part of the GFCI, is that correct? Is there a "right" way to do this outside of running a new line back to the breaker? I'm going to try finding which outlet this current one goes to to see if it also has something on the load side, and if not, if it isn't too far, then I'll run that back to the kitchen where I need it.

Any other options?
 
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Old 03-23-17, 01:01 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

There isn't a limit to the load connections or receptacles connected to the load side of a GFI receptacle.

By code.... the counter top receptacles can only be used on the counter top.
Also by code..... two counter top receptacles need to be provided.

Your installation may be an old existing installation before the two circuit requirement.
Now may be a good time to run an additional circuit.
 
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Old 03-23-17, 03:01 PM
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The issue is whether the box has enough capacity left to add an additional cable.

You can have two loads from the load terminals of the gfi. The grounds will need to be spliced.
 
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Old 03-23-17, 03:44 PM
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By splicing the grounds, are you just saying wirecap them and run a little jumper to the gfi? That's pig tailing, right?
 
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Old 03-23-17, 03:47 PM
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Thanks for the replies, the help is very appreciated.

There's actually 7 counter top outlets (home built in 2000), so I suspect I'm good code wise.

I've moved our dsl modem/wi-fi up to the kitchen, so right now it's on the countertop by the sink (which I don't like). So I'm just going to extend the telephone jack and electrical 4' "up" so that they can live on top of the cabinet.

The pictures attached are what I'm dealing with. Since the current load lines uses the plugs, can I just add my new wires to the screws and call it a win?

Edit: sorry, can't figure out file sizes on images. Link below.

https://imgur.com/gallery/DMoUp
 
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Old 03-23-17, 04:15 PM
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That file is 3.2 megs..... 3000x4000 pixels which is WAY over the board limit.

Anyway.... a GFI device uses rear entrance holes for wiring because of the width of the device. You couldn't put a wire on the screw itself as the device would not fit in the box.
These are not stab lock connections.

As seen in the picture.... each screw terminal accepts two wires.

Name:  rmu3Uev.jpg
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Old 03-23-17, 04:30 PM
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Poor writing on my choice, I was noticing the file size limit. I couldn't figure out how to make the files smaller. User error totally!

But I've never noticed the dual slots. So my outlet is actually already set up to allow more than one line on the load side? That's fantastic, you learn something new every day I guess.

Thanks again for all the help.
 
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Old 03-23-17, 04:43 PM
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Gfi will take two conductors under each clamp.
 
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Old 03-23-17, 05:59 PM
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No problem with the pictures. It is easy to get confused with actual size and file size.
I run several different picture processing programs as I convert many pictures here.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 06:45 PM
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Hey, just out of curiosity, when would someone use both line receptacles?
 
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Old 03-24-17, 07:07 PM
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when would someone use both line receptacles?
There are times where it is better to use a second GFCI at a distant location rather then a regular receptacle off the load because if the first GFCI tripped you would still have power to the second GFCI. The other reason would be if the next load didn't need GFCI protection. An example would be a light. You wouldn't want to be in the dark if the GFCI tripped. (Note in a kitchen the lights can't be on the same circuit as the receptacle but the example is common in bathrooms where lights and receptacles can share a circuit.)
 
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Old 03-24-17, 08:20 PM
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Thanks, Ray. Similar to your light example, I don't actually want the devices (wi-fi router/modem) on this outlet to go if the GFCI trips. So if I'm understanding you it sounds like I might be better suited using the other line receptacle, rather than the other load receptacle?
 
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