right way grounding and bonding

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  #1  
Old 03-25-17, 06:49 PM
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right way grounding and bonding

I got a basement with
lead water supply line more then 6' away from ground rod

2 breakers boxes
ground rod next to breaker boxes

gas line

whats the proper way to ground and bond all of it?

1. could i run #6 copper wire to ground rod and from ground rod to water line ?
or do i need to run 2 wires from the breaker box as in picture?

2. same question for the gas line

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  #2  
Old 03-25-17, 07:21 PM
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First of all, lead water supply line???

Second, How are the boxes connected? Is this a duplex or something that had the services combined? Or is it just a main and subpanel? Are there any disconnects before them (like at the meter)?

Third, you have to check your local codes about bonding the gas line, because it is not an NEC requirement. Normally only CSST (flexible corrugated stainless, will have a thick, smooth yellow or black jacket - not to be confused with the short flexible appliance connectors where you can see the corrugation) is required to be separately bonded (by a clamp on the CSST transition fitting/manifold or the iron/brass fitting immediately upstream of it). Otherwise gas lines are normally accepted to be bonded by the circuits feeding the appliances they are connected to.
 
  #3  
Old 03-25-17, 08:15 PM
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1) lead line with thin copper inside. I think it was a standard in olden days?

this is duplex
with 2 panels inside the basement
there is no disconnect by the 2 meters that are located on the outside of the house

so 2 meters leading to 2 main panels inside the basement

3) I have CSST line on the gas line

Thank u for your time
 
  #4  
Old 03-25-17, 08:36 PM
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Ok.. How far does the lead line come into the house? (That's REALLY scary BTW.. I've seen city water eat all the way through regular copper pipes, let alone a thin copper sleeve.) Does it transition to copper at any point within 5' of where it enters? Is there a meter inside?

You may end up driving a second rod outside because I honestly don't know if any clamps are rated for use on lead.

Is the entire gas system CSST or has it just been used to reroute iron in a few places? Does CSST come inside from the meter? Is it distributed via a central manifold or is it a single line that's teed off where it needs to go?
 
  #5  
Old 03-25-17, 08:50 PM
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1. 1 foot into the house that it goes into meter and pex

2. some inspectors dont allow as the meter considered to be "non accessible place" as electrical providers locks it.

3. it has being used to reroute iron in few places. Almost whole run is iron pipe and at the end of a single line that's teed off where it needs to go
 
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Old 03-25-17, 09:30 PM
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1. Ugh. I'll have to defer to someone familiar with lead, as it's non-existent around here. As I said, I don't think there are any clamps rated for lead pipe, because lead is so soft that it "flows" under pressure and loosens over time. I also don't know if lead is allowed to be used as a GEC at all. If the entire water system beyond the meter is PEX then you don't bond it.

2. I was talking about the water meter.

3. Ok the gas code says it can be bonded anywhere along the system after it comes into the house, but your AHJ might require it closer (older code required it at the point of entry). Use #6 and clamp it to the ground rod.
 
  #7  
Old 03-26-17, 05:45 PM
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It will be easier to bond the hot and cold and gas near the water heater normally .

Lead in the drinking water can cause health issues and retardation. I would look at remediation and replacement .
 
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Old 03-26-17, 06:18 PM
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Just remember the source of lead posion in Flint wasn't really the water but the pipes.
The corrosive water pumping underneath Flint quickly ate away at the protective layer inside the city's old lead pipes, exposing bare lead to the water flowing through them. This lead was the source of the initial contamination,


Read more: Scientists Now Know Exactly How Lead Got Into Flint's Water | Science | Smithsonian
http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
 
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Old 03-26-17, 07:05 PM
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It will be easier to bond the hot and cold and gas near the water heater normally .
I'm led to believe that there is only PEX beyond the meter.
 
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Old 03-26-17, 07:13 PM
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The water will pick up the lead on the way into the house.
 
 

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