Need input on service panel conductor routing


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Old 05-04-17, 12:11 PM
J
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Need input on service panel conductor routing

Today I'm finally installing all my 40 breakers in the service panel. So many times past I have seen the conductors routed completely around the inside of the pane and then terminated at the breaker. Since my incoming conductors don't exactly come in on the appropriate side of the top to make this clean...I would rather eliminate all that looped wire and cut each one leave a little slack and make a nice 90 turn into the breaker? I could not find any verbiage in the NEC about this. Im building my own home and want to do it correctly and of course pass my electrical inspection. Thanks for your help. Jim
 
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Old 05-04-17, 12:31 PM
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Panel

All the conductors must fit into the cavity between the breakers and the outer walls of the panel so that the cover will fit securely. Each breaker can only serve one branch circuit.
 
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Old 05-04-17, 12:39 PM
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Thanks wirepuller38 but what I meant is do I have to leave all that excess looped wire in the panel box or can I shorten each conduction and make a nice clean 90 into each breaker thus avoiding the loop from the incoming conductor all the way around the inside of the panel... such as I have seen many times other jobs..in other words does the NEC require all thAt extra wire in the panel box?
Thanks.
 
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Old 05-04-17, 02:48 PM
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Bends

A conductor entering the panel on the same side as where the breaker being used is located would have one 90 degree bend to the breaker. A conductor entering the panel on the opposite side from where the breaker being used is located would have three 90 degree bends: two at the bottom corners of the panel and one at the breaker.

Breakers are not usually installed and connected during the rough-in inspection. All conductors are of sufficient length to reach breakers on the opposite side since you will not be able to match conductors and breakers at the rough-in stage. Extra length is trimmed away when connections are made to the breakers.
 
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Old 05-04-17, 04:54 PM
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Hey wirepuller38-thank you. That makes sense. I noticed we. Oth live in TN. I'm in Franklin.
Take care,
Jim
 
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Old 05-04-17, 05:03 PM
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Each breaker can only serve one branch circuit.
Wirepuller38
You need to clarify what would be more than one circuit. I'm not aware of any code that numerates circuits protected by a single OCPD. Some breakers are approved to have two wires connected to the terminal. You can also pigtail multiple runs in the service panel to land one wire on a breaker where the breaker is not approved for connecting two wires.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 10:30 AM
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I usually leave a little 'drip loop' in each branch circuit hot wire to leave some slack for future changes.

I used to leave a lot of extra, but found it just fills up space, and the chance of having to move a breaker from one side of the box to another just doesn't happen that often.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 10:41 AM
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The conductors can always be extended later if needed. No need for extra when cutting in a panel.
 
 

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