Moving range wiring for new Island

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-08-17, 08:05 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Moving range wiring for new Island

Hello. I am planning on moving the range wiring for a new island I am installing. Picture of the current wiring is attached and you can see it is on the wall. The current installation had a slide in range and with my wife's direction I am picking out a stove top + wall oven that fit over one another in the island.

1) I am thinking the best way to extend the wiring to the island is to splice in additional wire in the current junction box, run beneath the subfloor into the island location. Would this be the best approach to extending the wire? It would be a huge job to re-run wire down to the breaker box in the garage. The wire appears to be 6/2 but please let me know if the picture or your knowledge would show the wire is not 6/2.

2) Currently I have a 50amp breaker (picture attached). I am changing from radiant heat stove to induction stove and it appears that the induction cooktop can use 35amps. The oven specs show that it wants a 20amp breaker (can't find the actual draw on the oven). The stove states it wants a separate junction box from the oven and I was planning on splitting the circuit between boxes but will I have enough power (aka does the spec page saying it wants a 20 amp breaker mean it can only draw 15 so I should be okay since the stove is 35+15=50)?

3) In the event I am able to use the current breaker would you recommend my current thought of extending the wire from the current location under subfloor, then splitting wire into two junction boxes at the island? Please explain if there is a better solution than this.

I have attached diagram of the junction box from the induction cooktop, picture of breaker, picture of current 6/2 wire that is located right side of kitchen, and a picture of my kitchen for reference of where the island will be located. Below are the appliances I am interested in purchasing. Thanks and I appreciate the feedback!

Frigidaire Gallery 30 in. Smooth Ceramic Glass Induction Cooktop in Black with 4 Elements-FGIC3067MB - The Home Depot

GE 30 in. Single Electric Wall Oven Self-Cleaning with Steam in Stainless Steel-JT3000SFSS - The Home Depot

Matt
 
Attached Images     
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-09-17, 07:05 AM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: United States, Virginia
Posts: 1,465
Received 102 Votes on 81 Posts
Each appliance needs its own circuit. If either of those appliances need both 120V and 240V the circuit will nee to be brought up to code by using a 4 wire feeder since the circuit is being modified.
 
  #3  
Old 10-09-17, 11:05 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,656
Received 86 Votes on 76 Posts
Even if all you needed was a 50 amp circuit you would have a problem, you cannot extend a 3-wire range circuit and would have to bring the circuit up to the most recent code. 3-wire range circuits went away in the 1996 NEC. Frankly I wouldn't want an old aluminum circuit reconnected in my house anyway. Just install two new circuits following the manufacturer's specs'.
 
  #4  
Old 10-09-17, 11:17 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree, you need to run two new 240V circuits.
The oven is 20 amps, but that's 240 volts, not 120. The wall (under counter) oven requires a 20A 240V double pole breaker and 12-3 w/ground cable.
 
  #5  
Old 10-09-17, 11:52 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,656
Received 86 Votes on 76 Posts
The wall (under counter) oven requires a 20A 240V double pole breaker and 12-3 w/ground cable.

Disagree......a 20A 240 circuit can be installed with 12-2 NM-B cable.
 
  #6  
Old 10-09-17, 12:01 PM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: United States, Virginia
Posts: 1,465
Received 102 Votes on 81 Posts
I'm thinking Handyone said 12/3 on the oven because of possibly needing 120V for controls/clock timer. Though the specs only say 240V.
 
  #7  
Old 10-09-17, 07:51 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,656
Received 86 Votes on 76 Posts
I'm thinking Handyone said 12/3 on the oven because of possibly needing 120V for controls/clock timer. Though the specs only say 240V.

That is quite possible, but that would be a 120/240 volt circuit. I have seen a few manufacturer's that have in error called out a 120/240 volt circuit requirement as a 240 volt circuit, but then in their specs called out a requirement for a neutral conductor.
 
  #8  
Old 10-10-17, 02:07 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'll try to get my terminology correct

The problem I've noticed with wall ovens is that you almost need to see the oven to understand the installation.
One common thing you see is that the whip neutral is crimped to the whip ground wire. The two wires need separated for a 4-wire installation.
 
  #9  
Old 10-10-17, 02:16 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I appreciate the responses! I am going to go with your recommendations to have two new circuits installed. Also have decided that 240 is a bit over my head so will let an electrician do this work! Thanks again guys
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: