Electric stove wiring


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Old 11-07-17, 01:19 PM
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Electric stove wiring

I've just had a meltdown on a stove at our ranch that tested out OK for me when I ran all the burners and the oven initially. The old stove ran on a 30 amp 220v breaker pair for years (with aluminum supply wire) so that's what I replaced it with with new breakers on a new electrical panel in the renovations. I ran 10 gage copper wire to the stove since it was a very short run. In hindsight it probably needs to be 8 gauge and I will replace it with that but it'll be a week or two.

What happened was the connection block on the old stove that the electrical plug screws down on melted on one leg and deformed to the point the connection screw shorted on the cover. No other signs of trauma along the electrical wires showed up. So my question is this - is it possible that the 10 gage wire still had enough resistance to melt the connection block but not have a meltdown in the supply circuit wires itself? The stove was one my mother-in-law cooked on for years with no real problems like this at all.
 
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Old 11-07-17, 03:20 PM
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If the original circuit was aluminum then it needed to be #8 for 30A. Using copper it only needs to be #10 for 30A. The meltdown may have been caused by a bad/loose connection.
 
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Old 11-07-17, 03:39 PM
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A problem like that caused by a loose terminal block screw is extremely common.
I see it all the time in electric dryers.
 
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Old 11-07-17, 04:40 PM
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That's kind of what I was thinking but I don't remember the wire being loose when I was into the stove prior to testing it out. I had to replace a top burner switch and the insulation on the top of the oven that mice had nested in. It's entirely possible, though. None of the wiring in the stove, especially that served by the leg that melted down, appeared to be shorted or burned/toasted. I was just afraid that the 10 gauge wire was restricting the current flow and that's were it kind of bottlenecked.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-08-17, 03:31 AM
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40 amp is generally minimum for stove. 8Cu/6Al
 
 

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