electrical box (maximum wires)

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Old 11-14-17, 06:11 PM
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electrical box (maximum wires)

Hi everyone,

I want to wire a new circuit but got confused trying to figure out the maximum number of wires that can fit in a box.

I am using a 4 x 4 x 1 1/2 box with 12/2. I have a 15A GFCI and a regular 15A duplex outlet.

I have a line wire feeding into this box and then that wire leads out to wire other boxes.

I count 9 conductors in this case, that's 1 for ground, 4 conductors from the wires, 2 for the GFCI and 2 for the duplex.

I'm using halex screw in box connectors to secure the wires so i didn't count them towards the number of wires.
Am I correct in this?

I was using this page to determine the max number of connectors:

http: www bhg com/home-improvement/electrical/how-many-wires-in-an-electrical-box/
 
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Old 11-14-17, 07:06 PM
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I agree with the 9 conductors .
 
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Old 11-14-17, 07:37 PM
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When you use a 4" square box for splicing and installing devices..... use a deep box.
It will save a lot of aggravation/
 
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Old 11-20-17, 09:39 AM
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aside from following box fills, using the appropriate grounding screws, maintaining the 1/4" sheathing and 6" exposed conductors, leaving a small loop of wire near the junction box, using insulated staples at scheduled intervals, mounting no further back than 1/4 from the edge of a stud and not putting more than one wire per clamp (unless rated otherwise), using proper gauged wire or lower per circuit breaker and not overloading wirenuts..

Any other main points that one should be aware of when installing lights & switches?
 
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Old 11-20-17, 10:52 AM
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mounting no further back than 1/4 from the edge of a stud
Not sure what this is referring to.

The wiring should be stapled as close to center as possible on a stud. Many times I'll put two wires under a staple. It requires the staple to not be overdriven. If you have several wires traveling down a stud to a box.... the new fastening system called stackits is great. It also works well if the stud section is narrow and you can't swing a hammer in it.

Name:  stackit 2.jpg
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The one on the left comes with a nail. The red one on the right comes with a screw and is what the depot carries.
 
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Old 11-20-17, 11:07 AM
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I think they were talking about the setback from the finished surface.
 
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