Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Electrical - AC & DC
Reload this Page >

Running Cable, Installing New Circuit - Tips, Tricks, Best Practices, etc.

Running Cable, Installing New Circuit - Tips, Tricks, Best Practices, etc.

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-26-17, 09:02 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 280
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Running Cable, Installing New Circuit - Tips, Tricks, Best Practices, etc.

I have done a lot of electrical work in my home, and I have tried to get a good understanding of the NEC. I feel like I struggle sometimes with actually doing the installation. I know what needs to be done, but I'm sometimes not sure of the best way to do it. I wanted to see if anyone could answer a few questions and possibly give me some tips:

1. When installing a new circuit, is it better to start at the panel or where the new circuit terminates? If it doesn't matter, is one preferable to the other?

2. Do you strip the NM jacket before inserting the cable into the box or after? I used to strip the jacket first, but I recently nicked the insulation on one of the conductors. I was pulling it through, and the internal clamp damaged the insulation.

3. Should I leave any extra slack in the panel when installing a new circuit? I noticed one of the electricians that I used left extra length in the panel, which I assume makes it easier to move the circuit if necessary.

4. Is there any best practice for putting wires back into a junction box? I try to keep the hots and neutrals on opposite sides, but I didn't know if there was a preferred method.

If anyone has any other pointers or suggestions, please feel free to share them! Thanks in advance for any input.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-26-17, 10:41 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,174
Received 92 Votes on 79 Posts
!, Either works, all depends on where you can roll out the cable.
2. I use a NM cable stripper that will cut the sheath. I leave the sheath on until it is in the box or connector.
3. No real need to leave extra. It just clutters up the panel. More can be spliced on later in the rare event it needs to move
4. Just try to make the wires fit without any really sharp bends. Other than that I don't worry about it. For device boxes I keep the hots separated to the side of the device that they go on.
 
  #3  
Old 11-26-17, 11:00 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 280
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
2. I use a NM cable stripper that will cut the sheath. I leave the sheath on until it is in the box or connector.
That's a great idea. By any chance, do you use the Klein K1412 stripper? I really liked this tool for removing the sheath, but I realized that it was cutting into the individual conductors. I don't know if I was pressing too hard, or if I did something incorrectly. I have to try it on some test wire to see if there's a technique. I'm afraid to use it now, so I've been using the Ideal ripper stripper.
 
  #4  
Old 11-26-17, 11:04 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,174
Received 92 Votes on 79 Posts
That is the one I use. Never noticed the conductors getting cut. Did you use the correct size for the cable?

Practice on some scrap.
 
  #5  
Old 11-26-17, 03:22 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,663
Received 220 Votes on 194 Posts
1) I will normally get the circuit wires and then pull the home run to the panel, but I will do what ever is easier for me.

2) I use a Ideal cable stripper similar to the Kilne. You might be pinching them too hard. You just want to score the cable jacket then bend it with your hands a couple of times to break the jacket. I typically am opposite from PCboss, I strip the cable jacket and paper before inserting it into the box/connector.

3) I do not like leaving loops in a panel. It just takes up wire space.

4) When pushing the wires in a box it will depend on the box. If it is a switch box I will push the neutrals in the back of the box. Other boxes and wires I prebend the wires like an accordion and push then into the box. I do not keep the wires on one side of the other, just make sure the grounds are not touching anything they shouldn't.
 
  #6  
Old 11-26-17, 09:52 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,617
Received 46 Votes on 41 Posts
I see that there is a Klein K1412 and a K1412-3. The -3 version is listed as a quarter turn cutter (and discontinued?) that have reports of cutting individual conductors. Any knowledge of that?
 
  #7  
Old 11-27-17, 06:53 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,663
Received 220 Votes on 194 Posts
The -3 version was for scoring 3 wire romex cable. However things have changed and 3 wire cable is more flat then round.
 
  #8  
Old 11-27-17, 07:11 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 59,705
Received 1,175 Votes on 1,089 Posts
Any stripper needs to be used with caution. The jackets are getting thinner and thinner.

I was working with some older NM-b cable last week...... Ettcoflex
Now that was a job to strip. The 14-2 was actually larger than the 12-2 is now.
 
  #9  
Old 11-27-17, 07:21 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,617
Received 46 Votes on 41 Posts
The -3 version was for scoring 3 wire romex cable. However things have changed and 3 wire cable is more flat then round.
That makes sense. I've run into some old round 14/3 that looked like white SJO cord.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: