Radiant heater wiring question


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Old 03-09-18, 02:17 PM
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Radiant heater wiring question

Hi,
I'm in the process of installing 5 Comfort Cove radiant heaters in a workshop. There are: one 450W, 2 ea, 1050W, and 2 ea. 1500W heaters. These will be wired to an existing 100 A panel in the shop.

Per the manufacturer, these draw as follows (@240V):
450 W = 1.9A
1050 W = 4.4A
1500 W = 6.3A

My original intent was to run #10 wire from a 30A double-pole breaker on one circuit, split into 2 runs: the 450, a 1050, and a 1500W on one run, and the other two on the second run. I had planned to control them all with one thermostat, but now I notice that the digital 208/240V 'stat available from the manufacturer is only rated for 15A, They have a manual 'stat rated for 22A, but of course these heaters add up to 23+ A.

Now I am "assuming" that I will actually need to have two 15A circuits, with a separate thermostat for each circuit. At least I can drop down to #12 wire, so it may be close to a wash, but a little more work. I just would rather have a single 'stat for the whole room, but that doesn't appear to be possible.

Is my assumption correct, i.e two 15A circuits, two thermostats, or is there a work-around to enable using a single 'stat?

Thanks in advance!
 

Last edited by sundvl76; 03-09-18 at 02:19 PM. Reason: clarification
  #2  
Old 03-09-18, 07:55 PM
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You could use a single thermostat that controls a relay that then switches the heaters on and off, but the cost of the relay and box would be more then adding a second thermostat. You are better off anyway running one 15 and one 20 amp circuits (using 14ga or 12 ga respectively) as the #10 wire would also be very difficult to work with to wire to the thermostat and the heaters. (See below)

If you want you could just install the two stats right next to each other for ease of use.

BTW - If you install 1- 1500w, 1- 1050w and 1- 450w you would be over the 12 amp limit of a continuous load, so that circuit I recommend using #12 wire and a 20 amp breaker.
 
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Old 03-10-18, 05:54 AM
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Thank you, Tony, that is a great and complete answer. I had not considered the continuous load aspect, so that is good info. Thanks again. Neal
 
 

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