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Properly grounding/bonding Network equipment and IP Cameras?

Properly grounding/bonding Network equipment and IP Cameras?

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  #1  
Old 03-20-18, 11:23 AM
J
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Properly grounding/bonding Network equipment and IP Cameras?

Hi all,

I have a dedicated network DMARC in my house with a 12U rack and separate coax distribution. I plan to install outdoor PoE cameras in the very near future and want to make sure I do my diligence in protecting the equipment BEHIND the cameras.

I understand the typical setup is getting a Grounding Bus Bar and connecting the equipment or racks to the bar and then likewise connecting the cameras to a Ethernet surge protector (with shielded CAT6) and ground the ethernet Surge protector to the bus bar. My question is with the bonding of the bus bar to an earthed ground...How do I accomplish this?

Is it sufficient to use a copper pipe clamp and clamp a ground wire to the copper plumbing coming in to my house? Or am I forced to bring the copper wire to the electrical panel's grounding bus?

On that same note, if clamping it to plumbing is acceptable, is it OK to run the ground wire (with a PVC jacket) in plastic wiremold that it also housing Ethernet cables into the Utility room where the copper plumbing is? My route to get to the attic goes through my laundry/utility room. I already have wiremold in place to get the Ethernet cables there...I just am not sure if I'm allowed to run the ground wire, again with a PVC jacket, through the same conduit.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!

John
 
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  #2  
Old 03-20-18, 11:45 AM
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As far as code goes, the only requirements in this situation are that the main incoming telecom services to the house such as from your cable, phone or satellite provider are bonded to the electrical service ground at the point of entry to the house. The rack itself is grounded through the mounting ears of your switch/router which will have a three-prong plug.

I would consider adding a surge protection device at the point of entry of your telecom service, and install a panel-mounted surge protector in your main electrical panel. Beyond that, in my opinion there is no added value of more surge protection devices in a residential setting.

Note that since you're using STP cable, you also need to use shielded keystone jacks, RJ-45 plugs, a shielded patch panel and terminate ONE side of the shield and drain wire properly for it to have any effect. Again in my opinion this is all a complete waste of time and money in residential setting as there are no EMF strong enough to warrant anything beyond standard UTP cable and connectors.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 12:58 PM
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Hmmm...interesting input. What about lightning strikes? I know a direct strike will fry anything, but nearby strikes and the surge provided with them?
 
  #4  
Old 03-20-18, 01:36 PM
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There are two big concerns with a nearby (non-direct) lightning strike and one smaller one.

The first is that it hit a power line which means your incoming line voltage spikes -- this is where the panel mounted surge protector takes effect. They have much greater surge redirection capacity than plug in or power strip models, and they also are directly adjacent to your earth grounding system which makes the panel mounted model significantly more effective than plug-in or power strip models at defending against this type of surge.

The second is elevated ground potential -- this is where the lightning causes the ground itself to briefly become charged in a radius around the strike. The mitigation for this is to ensure your incoming electrical service and telecom services connect to the same earth ground point ("single point grounding"). That way the ground potential for all your utilities rises and falls together and you don't get destructive arcing through your cable modem for example if the coax has a 1000V different ground potential than the power supply.

The third smaller concern is induced current. A lightning strike creates a huge blast of electrical and magnetic noise which will be picked up by any long wire much like an antenna picks up a radio signal. The larger and closer this blast is, the more potentially destructive current could be induced on wiring in or around the home. The reason this one is a minor concern is that it's extremely low probability that a lightning strike is close enough to induce destructive current, but far enough away that you don't need to file a homeowners insurance claim anyway.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 05:19 PM
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The starting point is to ground your system by running a wire to the ground bus bar in your service panel (breaker panel with .
the first whole house disconnect switch or breaker).

Should your wire first reach an existing grounding electrode conductor (fat ground wire already coming from the panel and going to a ground rod or to a cold water pipe close to where the latter exits the house underground) then your newly run ground wire may end and be attached there.
 
  #6  
Old 03-21-18, 06:28 AM
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One other issue, you may have other grounding paths from copper water lines, or lightning rods.
You may get occasional voltage from street trees that are in conctact with cable tv AND electric distribution wires.
 
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