Wiring connectors for large wires


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Old 07-31-18, 01:41 PM
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Question Wiring connectors for large wires

How do you safely connect a 4 AWG wire to a 10 AWG wire? How do you connect two 4 AWG wires together? You cannot use a wireless connector. The Aluminum blocks with the 2 screws do the trick but with copper wire you need to add goo to keep electrolosys from happening, and that are rather bullky. I looked for crimp style connectors and found nothing that large. What is the best solution? I think I have a great solution but I will defer to the professionals here on this great forum for advice.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 01:45 PM
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I forgot to mention that these wires are copper stranded insulated wires
 
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Old 07-31-18, 03:29 PM
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Most termination lugs are rated for aluminum and copper. If you are using copper you should not need to use anti-oxidation paste like you do with aluminum wire. (you can if you want to)

For splicing larger wires I normally use Polaris insulated connectors like these: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Polaris-...FVgegQodtO8IJQ

They are expensive, but worth every penny.

Why are you splicing #10s to #4 wires?
 
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Old 07-31-18, 03:54 PM
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Are you splicing copper to copper or aluminum to copper ?
Polaris connector is the best one, but if you want to save money or cannot get one, you can use split bolt splice and rubber electric tape.

Most split bolt splice are for copper to copper, but there are aluminum to copper as well. It has a plate in the middle and you put one wire at top and one wire at bottom to separate them.

Wrap splice with rubber tape, then wrap it again with regular electric tape as rubber tape doesn't stick very well.
 
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Old 08-01-18, 06:06 AM
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I am running 4 AWG copper insulated wires from a Reliance PB50 Inlet plug to a Reliance 510C 50 amp 10 circuit power transfer switch for my generator. Inside the transfer switch there are a BK and RD wire that looks to be about 10 AWG...(maybe 8 AWG?). I connected those wires to my 4 AWG RD & BK wires using Blackburn 0.8-in Aluminum and Copper Split Bolts from Lowes. I then insulated them with tape BUT I did not add any anti-corrosion goop when I did assemble them. These connectors are a bit large but they do fit in the panel. Am I OK to leave them like that? If not then I figure some sort of copper crimp connector would do the trick. I am aware of the split bolt but they are an odd shape to tape up in a confined area. So, am I OK just the way bit is? The connectors are tin coated aluminum.
 
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Old 08-01-18, 06:09 AM
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These are the ones I used:
BTW did I ask a dumb connection. Does the name of these connectors answer my question??? https://www.lowes.com/pd/Blackburn-0...Bolt/999922658

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Last edited by PJmax; 08-01-18 at 09:04 AM. Reason: added pic from link
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Old 08-01-18, 09:01 AM
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Those are 100% perfect. Technically they are split bolt or two screw bugs. I use them all the time. They can combine copper to copper or copper to aluminum. Copper requires no anti corrosion grease.... only aluminum does.
 
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Old 08-01-18, 09:59 AM
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As I was typing my last reply I noted that the title of these connectors were tin coated aluminum..........DUH!!


Getting old is not for sissies trust me!

Thanks for all the information. Like I always say any website is great because of it's members!! This site is the best of the best!
 
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Old 08-01-18, 03:55 PM
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What you have used works, but in some cases, it can actually take more space than a split bolt due to turning radius. With a split bolt, you can connect both wires on the same side and take less room.

Although the name of connector you used says it is split bolt, it is not. Split bolt is literally a bolt that has split in the middle.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 05:09 AM
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I agree with their name but in is in place and working. IF I saw the copper split bolts I would have used them but the shelves in this area was rather tossed so either they were not there or I missed them. As long as what I did use is OK to use and no anti-corrosion compound is needed I can't see why there is any need to swap out these connectors now.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 05:17 PM
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There is no need to replace as long as the splice fits safely inside a box.
 
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Old 08-03-18, 05:52 AM
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Since no anti-corrosion compound is needed why undo a good connection to add the compound, right!?
 
 

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