RV sub panel/generator switch


  #1  
Old 09-06-18, 02:39 PM
D
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RV sub panel/generator switch

I just poured an RV pad and my main house panel is right there so I am going to install a 50 amp RV plug at the panel. I also have a 3000W stand-alone generator that I use with my trailer. My question is do they make a sub panel that can be wired as both a 50 amp shore power plug for the rv, and a 30 amp generator switch for the house (to supply power to the panel during outages)? Obviously they would be separate plugs inside the sub panel and would not be used simultaneously.

Also, I know enough about electricity to know what I want to do with it, but Iím smart enough to hire an actual electrician to do the work. Lol
 
  #2  
Old 09-06-18, 03:21 PM
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You want both 50A receptacle (outlet) for RV and 30A inlet for generator feed to your house. Am I understanding correctly?

Why do you need a sub panel if that is that case? Do you not have enough breaker space in your main panel?

All you need is install 50A (NEMA 14-50) receptacle outside for your RV and run 6-3 cable with ground to it from the main panel. Install 50A 2 pole breaker.
For generator inlet.
Install 30A generator inlet outside (it has male L14-30 twist lock connection), install generator transfer switch like this next to your main panel.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Reliance...0CRK/205793178
Run 10-3 to between generator inlet and transfer switch.
Move over circuits you want to power from generator to the transfer switch.

You may choose to back feed your main panel with just 30A 2 pole breaker and a lockout kit to prevent main and generator feed from turning on at the same time.
However, it is not recommended for 30A due to possibility of overloading the generator.
If you choose this route, you will have to turn off all breakers in the main panel, turn off main, turn on generator feed, then turn on breakers for the circuits you want to feed. You will have to watch your load. Transfer switch kit comes with ammeter for that purpose, but if you choose to back feed your main panel, you will just have to guess or install a separate ammeter yourself.


If you are just trying to utilize same line for 50A receptacle for generator, you can't because it is not safe without a lockout to keep both main and generator feed to be on at the same time. With lockout installed, you cannot get power to the receptacle at all.
 
  #3  
Old 09-06-18, 04:52 PM
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Even if the generator pad is next to the RV pad, the line from the generator inlet on the outside wall must be dedicated and run to the vicinity of the first panel (usually the primary house load center) that will receive generator power. At the latter location you have the transfer switch or interlock.

(copied from another post) No branch circuit or feed or set of wires or cable is bidirectional (Reason is at the end of the preceding post). The same cable may not bring utility power to the RV or RV subpanel and also bring generator power to the feeding panel.
 
  #4  
Old 09-06-18, 08:52 PM
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Thank you both. Perhaps sub panel is not the correct term. My main panel has room for the 50A breaker. The two systems (50A outlet and 30A generator supply) are completely separate; Iím not trying to use the same wire. Iím just trying to avoid too many panels or housings around my main panel so I am hoping to enclose both the outlet and the supply plug in a single housing.

For the generator feed, my plan was to use an isolation switch to prevent the generator and utility feed from being connected at the same time but I was going to charge the entire panel. I know the generator will not power the entire house so my plan was to simply turn all the breakers off except the few necessary ones (refrigerator, etc) when I connect the generator. That just seemed way easier than powering specific circuits.
 
  #5  
Old 09-07-18, 04:45 AM
L
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I am hoping to enclose both the outlet and the supply plug in a single housing.
50A outlet and generator inlet can be in the single housing, but never seen one pre-made.
It won't look too bad to have 2 boxes next to each other.

my plan was to use an isolation switch
Do you mean a transfer switch to switch the feed going to your main panel?

It would be cheaper to install generator interlock kit. It is just a metal bracket preventing main and generator feed breaker from turned on at the same time.

It is better if you install a transfer switch panel I suggested previously.
 
 

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