disconnecting wires to hot tub

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Old 09-17-18, 09:27 AM
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disconnecting wires to hot tub

I've recently dismantled and removed a hot tub in my backyard that had been installed by the previous owner. The breaker from the main panel is turned off. I would now like to remove the remaining electric components. As a first step I was planning to remove the conduit that used to connect the outdoor electrical panel to the hot tub. However, the panel doesn't look like what I expected to see, ie, it doesn't look like a GFCI breaker. I've attached some pictures. The panel is a "CONNECTICUT ELECTRIC 06000 TYPE 3R DISCONNECT SWITCH 60A 240V-AC D596200", if you want to lookup the discontinued item on Amazon. The panel is a bit hard to reach, and I'm not sure how to get to the wires inside in order to disconnect them. Any suggestions on how to do this safely?

Many thanks in advance.
 
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Old 09-17-18, 01:52 PM
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That is a fused disconnect. It should be completely dead if the feeder breaker in the house main panel is turned off. After you pull out the fuse block, you can remove the middle metal plate which covers the wiring compartment. There is usually a screw or two near the bottom and if you hook something behind it and pull, the plate will swing out toward you hinging on a metal tab at the top. You'll be able to disconnect the wiring and remove the panel mounting screws if this is a complete demolition. If it was me, I would leave the box and conduit in case you ever have a future need for a subpanel in that location. It won't hurt anything to leave the panel side connected with the breaker turned off.
 
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Old 09-17-18, 02:09 PM
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I had a similar situation a loooong time ago in a previous house. I wound up removing everything down to the conduit and then dead ended the wire in a much smaller junction box. The breaker box was an eyesore, like yours it was all rusted and such. With the new junction box I was able to bend the conduit out of the way and mounted it to a nearby wall so it was unobtrusive and didn't look like an over site. I never used the wires again, not sure if the new owner would either but they were there when I sold it.
 
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Old 09-18-18, 07:57 AM
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Thanks for the help, folks. Thanks for pointing out the screws inside the box. I do see them now, hidden in the rust. I think I'll remove the outgoing conduit but leave the panel. It's rusty but well hidden.
 
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