Wiring in new addition within 6' of scuttle hole

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Old 12-13-18, 09:23 AM
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Wiring in new addition within 6' of scuttle hole

My new addition will have a scuttle hole for access to blow in insulation and also maybe light storage right next to the scuttle hole only. I know the code calls for wires to be protected within 6' of the scuttle. In the picture below, the scuttle hole will be within 6' but I have the wire running next to the roof joist instead of on top of it. Is this considered adequate protection since its not on top of roof truss joist member?


Also, I have another case where my wire makes a 90 degree turn, how the heck would I protect that with furring strips on both sides? Can I just place my NM-B wire into a conduit and that be considered acceptable for protection? What are my options in this situation?

https://imgur.com/a/pOSDEPd

Thanks to all.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 09:34 AM
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AFAIK, the "protection" is to prevent someone from stepping or tripping on the cable, so the cables running along the top of the sill plate should be fine. You may want to add a couple more staples.

Regarding the other cable that runs perpendicular, simply cut yourself a 2x4 and slide it under the cable, then staple the cable to the top, ensuring it is "protected" within 6' of the access.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 10:14 AM
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You can just install a runner when running perpendicular within 6'? I thought it had to be protected with a furring strip on both side of wire so as the wire isn't sticking above furring strip?
 
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Old 12-13-18, 10:23 AM
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You can just install a runner when running perpendicular within 6'? I thought it had to be protected with a furring strip on both side of wire so as the wire isn't sticking above furring strip?
It was acceptable many years ago when I was an electrician, but it looks like the code has changed:

320.23 In Accessible Attics. Type AC cables in accessible attics or roof spaces shall be installed as specified in 320.23(A) and (B).

(A) Where Run Across the Top of Floor Joists. Where run across the top of floor joists, or within 2.1 m (7 ft) of floor or floor joists across the face of rafters or studding, in attics and roof spaces that are accessible, the cable shall be protected by substantial guard strips that are at least as high as the cable. Where this space is not accessible by permanent stairs or ladders, protection shall only be required within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the nearest edge of the scuttle hole or attic entrance.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 11:09 AM
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Thanks, yeah that's the code I was looking at. I can install the furring strips without problem when the wiring is running straight.. The issue is when it makes a 90 degree turn, how do I protect that portion of the wire that is on a radius?

Dont believe I have to protect the wires in the photo due to being 1.5" below top of ceiling joist and 1.5" above where drywall will be attached..
 
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Old 12-13-18, 11:11 AM
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You should be fine. The code says 'across the top of floor joists'. Those are not across the top of the joist. They are in between the joist.

I believe the reason to be so that when you pile stuff on top of the joist you not be piling on top of the cables. Your cable being in between will not be damaged by piling stuff on top of the joists.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 11:21 AM
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The issue is when it makes a 90 degree turn, how do I protect that portion of the wire that is on a radius?
Can you post a picture so we can get a better idea of what you're dealing with?
 
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Old 12-13-18, 12:05 PM
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Here are the 2 scenarios that are in question that are within 6' of scuttle hole entrance.

https://imgur.com/a/9A4czA3

In this image, the wire is below the ceiling joist but dont have 1 1/4" to top of ceiling joist. Even if I move the staple down tight to rim joist of interior wall, I still dont believe I'll have 1 1/4". Would be very close. The scuttle hole is also right adjacent to this wire straight in front of my hand.

https://imgur.com/a/5tPyRAe

In this image, the wire goes overtop the ceiling joist which therefore would need protected due to being within 6' of scuttle hole.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 12:09 PM
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That cable is protected by the top plate underneath.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 12:24 PM
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There are 2 difference scenarios, what needs done to meet NEC code for attic area near scuttle hole within 6'(No ladder or steps).
 
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Old 12-13-18, 12:42 PM
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I didn't see the second picture. You must have edited your post. I imagine the cable going to the recessed fixture will be just fine. I wouldn't worry about it. The inspector will tell you if it needs something additional when he comes out to inspect your rough-in.

Is there a reason you decided to use 12 AWG Romex for your lights? 14 AWG is all you need and is easier to work with.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 12:52 PM
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I did edit the post due to issues with pictures attaching, sorry about that.

I'd rather spend a little bit extra and run a 20 amp circuit for lights. Just in case we want to switch out LEDs for something that uses more power in the future. Other then that, no real reason. I'm wiring all lights in 24 x 24 addition, including outside lights onto 1 20 amp circuit.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 01:05 PM
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Okay, well, just for example, 14 AWG would give you 1,440W of capacity assuming an 80% load factor, which would be equivalent to 22 recessed cans with 65W incandescent bulbs. Highly doubtful you'll get anywhere near that. It's just more of a PITA when doing your splices and connecting your devices.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 01:38 PM
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Thanks for the info.. I am putting in 16 recessed cans with LED lights so not much draw. Also have 2 bedroom lights/fans combo units, bathroom fan and lights, 2 closet lights, and 2 outdoor lights
 
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Old 12-13-18, 02:00 PM
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The second picture with the wire going over top of the truss could be an issue needing protection.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 04:27 PM
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The second picture with the wire going over top of the truss could be an issue needing protection.
Wonder if just putting a small piece of 1x2 on top of the ceiling joist adjacent to the wire would be sufficient?
 
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Old 12-14-18, 08:06 PM
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any suggestions from anyone on how to remedy this? Or should I let it go and see what the inspector thinks?
 
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Old 12-15-18, 07:24 AM
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As low as that area is i doubt protection would be required.
 
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Old 12-15-18, 07:52 PM
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Thumbs up

As low as that area is i doubt protection would be required.
It really cannot be accessed due to the height to roof sheeting.
 
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