Whirlpool Tub

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Old 12-22-18, 08:02 AM
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Whirlpool Tub

We are installing a whirlpool tub in my new addition bathroom. I have to install two dedicated 20A circuits, one to power tub motor and the other for the tub heater.

I was planning on placing two receptacles each on dedicated circuits into the enclosure that surrounds tub and place them on a GFCI/AFCI combo breaker but after reading today, I may just need a GFCI receptacle for this. Here's what the article says:

According to Section 680 of the NEC, an electrical disconnect device must be installed no closer than 5 feet (horizontal length) of the whirlpool tub but no farther than 10 feet and be readily accessible to the tub occupant. A GFCI with a disconnect button is sufficient to meet this requirement.


How do I go about having a disconnect button 5-10 feet away from the tub? The GFCI with a disconnect button, is that just one with the test and reset button on it?
 
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Old 12-22-18, 08:17 AM
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I installed a 60 gallon tub with heater and jets. We used it the first 2 years now it just takes up room. Hot water heater in crawl space had to add a extra heater to fill. I now have 2 30 gallon tanks.
 
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Old 12-22-18, 08:45 AM
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Biggest thing I'm unsure of is where to place receptacle (would like them inside tub enclosure), and whether a normal GFCI is considered q disconnect. Not sure why it says 5-10 feet away from tub, I would have a wire running across bathroom (ugly)
 
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Old 12-22-18, 09:00 AM
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A cord is considered a means of disconnect. Are you reading the disconnect requirements for a hot tub? They are different than a whirlpool tub.
 
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Old 12-22-18, 10:07 AM
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The article said whirlpool tubs but info may not be accurate. Ok to install the 2 receptacles that are on gfci afci breaker at panel under the enclosure to tub which will have access door to motor?

since you said a cord is a means of disconnect, basically just installing a receptacle and not being hardwired to tub motor is sufficient for a disconnect?

hoping to get these homeruns done today.. thanks
 
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Old 12-22-18, 10:20 AM
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Yes..... your plan is correct and ok.
 
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Old 12-22-18, 10:26 AM
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The GFI cannot be under the skirt of the tub. It needs to be accessible without removing panels.
 
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Old 12-22-18, 10:40 AM
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My understanding was that it was ok as long as no tools were needed to remove the panel.
 
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Old 12-22-18, 10:43 AM
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Looking at picture of other peoples jetted tubs, I dont see any receptacles or a plug running to a receptacle outside the tub skirting in any of them. Must be accessible as long as I put a hinged door or some access similar?
 
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Old 12-22-18, 01:55 PM
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Any clarity on this matter from anyone?
 
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Old 12-22-18, 02:11 PM
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Another alternative is to install a dead front GFI in the wall near the tub.

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Old 12-23-18, 07:44 AM
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A GFCI with a disconnect button is sufficient to meet this requirement.

I don't believe a GFCI device test button will qualify as a disconnect, but a wall switch would.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 07:49 AM
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The code changed and under the skirt does not count as readily accessible.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 03:20 PM
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So the receptacle for the heater plug and the motor plug cannot be under the skirting and I believe it cannot be within 5' of the tub. Dont think its feasible to run the cord across the middle of the bathroom floor to the receptacles.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 05:49 PM
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The cord.can remain under the skirt. The gfi cannot be under the skirt. It needs to be readily accessible.by.being on the wall nearby or at the panel.
 
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