Wiring shore power pedestal for boat

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Old 04-02-19, 09:18 AM
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Wiring shore power pedestal for boat

Hi, I have a question about wiring a new shore power pedestal on my dock.

I purchased a pedestal that has (2) 30 amp single pole square D QOU breakers and (2) double pole 50 amp breakers of the same type. My inspector advised the new code requires these breakers to be fault protected however they are $700 from the manufacturer. The more cost effective option is to install (2) double pole 50amp GFCI breakers in my house panel and have (2) 6 gauge runs to my dock. The run is 85ft long.

The pedestal is currently setup to accept a single run to a distribution block however the vendor can sell me an additional distribution block to split the two sides. In effect I would have a 50 amp GFCI breaker in my house feeding a pair of 50 and 30 amp recepticles on my pedestal.

The question is, will the single pole 30 amp recepticle work in this configuration since it's a single pole connected to a double pole 50 amp breaker in the house? Also, will this 85ft run be too long and cause the breaker to trip easily. Any thoughts and advice is appreciated.

Thank you,
Todd
 
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Old 04-02-19, 09:34 AM
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Another option would be to look at another subpanel manufacturer Square D Q0 is consistently the highest price brand.

In general you can only have one feed to a "structure". Whether the inspector considers your dock a separate structure is up to his opinion. If the vendor sells a conversion kit for dual feed, perhaps this would be an approved installation method however.

The 30A receptacle would need overcurrent protection via a 30A fuse or breaker to be code-compliant. It can function on a two-pole GFCI breaker so long as it connects between one of the hots and neutral, and the neutral is properly terminated on the breaker.

I'd probably do something more along the line of run a standard 100A feeder to a post/pedestal just outside the dock area, then in that panel install your 30A & 50A GFCI breakers to feed the shore power hookups. If you set it up right the panels can be back-to-back on the same post.
 
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Old 04-02-19, 10:29 AM
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All good suggestions. In regards to your comment:

"The 30A receptacle would need overcurrent protection via a 30A fuse or breaker to be code-compliant"

The pedestal has (2) 30 amp and (2) 50 amp breakers inside the pedestal, they are just not ground fault protected which is the issue I am trying to work around. So in this case would you say that the receptacles have overcurrent protection with this setup?
 
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Old 04-02-19, 10:41 AM
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One more question came to mind. The inspector mentioned the conduit needed to be buried 20" deep if I ran a 100amp line from house to dock. However if I am running two 50 amp GFCI protected runs to dock inside conduit, does this still need to be 20" deep?
 
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Old 04-02-19, 01:04 PM
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So in this case would you say that the receptacles have overcurrent protection with this setup?
Yes.

does this still need to be 20" deep?
Yes; code is actually 18" to the top of the pipe, so 20" accounts for pipe diameter. For six #6 copper + one #10 copper you'll need at least 1-1/4" conduit. Each circuit needs its own H,H,N but can share a ground.
 
 

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