Need more blower power.


  #1  
Old 07-05-19, 10:50 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Need more blower power.

I'm currently doing an experiment at home with an electrical motor taken out of a plug-in leaf blower. I took the motor out of the blower, connected it to a 12-volt battery, and, as expected, the motor does not work nearly as well as when it was plugged into a power outlet. The motor is rated for 12 amps and works on (I'm assuming anyway) AC. Right now, the motor is directly connected to the battery and I'm trying to get the motor to work as powerfully as it can. Similar to when it's plugged into a power outlet (without plugging it into the wall).

So, do any of you know how to do this? Thanks for the help.

P.S.
As you might have guessed, I know nothing about electrical equipment.

 
  #2  
Old 07-06-19, 12:49 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
Go and get yourself nine more 12 volt batteries and then wire all ten in series; positive post of the first battery to the negative post of the second battery and so on until all ten batteries are connected except for the negative post of the first battery and the positive post of the last battery which will connect to the blower.

You really should have a 15 ampere fuse or circuit breaker in the wiring to protect the batteries and wiring.

Don't want ten batteries? Get a 12 volt DC to 120 volt AC inverter with a capacity of 1,500 watts minimum to convert a single 12 volt battery to outputting 120 volts AC. It won't be cheap and it will run down the battery fairly quickly, maybe only minutes.
 
Guille voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 07-06-19, 04:31 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 5,007
Upvotes: 0
Received 245 Upvotes on 225 Posts
If you do connect the motor to an incorrect power source including connecting an alternating current motor to direct current (a battery) you could damage the motor. You could also set something on fire.

The chances of a mishap are much greater if you don't know much about electricity.

An unknown in your situation is whether (1) the leaf blower has a converter to deliver 12 volts DC to the motor and the battery you used delivers the same 12 volts but insufficient amperes resulting in a voltage drop in turn dropping the motor mechanical power outlet. Versus (2) the motor is a 120 volt motor and the battery delivering only 12 volts results in much lower mechanical power output which is intuitive.

If you feed a 120 volt motor with 12 volts and it runs at all it will almost certainly be very feeble, not running "nearly as well" as it did in the machine(leaf blower) fed with 120 volts. Since you said it worked "nearly as well" there is a good chance it was really a 12 volt motor and if you connect 10 batteries in series; in a "one to the next" chain, to deliver 120 volts you will burn out the motor. Whereas the 10 batteries in parallel, in a ladder arrangement, all of the positive battery terminals to one wire and all the negative battery terminals to a second wire, may well deliver enough amperes to run a 12 volt DC motor at full power. Or burn out the motor if it is an alternating current only motor.
 
Guille voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 07-06-19, 04:49 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 5,007
Upvotes: 0
Received 245 Upvotes on 225 Posts
For voltage think pressure, like 12 pounds per square inch; 40 PSI, 120 PSI, etc.

For amperes think volume, like 120 gallons per minute, 12 GPM, 3 GPM, etc.

When you took the motor out of the leaf blower and saw it was rated 12 amperes, the first experiment should not have been connect it to a 12 volt battery and see what happens.
 
Guille voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 07-06-19, 01:01 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,594
Received 1,708 Upvotes on 1,525 Posts
You can use an inverter to convert your 12 volt DC to 120 volts AC.
 
Guille voted this post useful.
  #6  
Old 07-06-19, 02:21 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,372
Received 475 Upvotes on 391 Posts
120 volt motor will not run on DC. I am surprised it even turns.
What is the make and model of the blower you took the motor from?
 
Guille voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 07-06-19, 04:34 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,967
Received 1,061 Upvotes on 963 Posts
I'm currently doing an experiment
So what's the experiment?
 
  #8  
Old 07-06-19, 11:16 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm almost positive the motor doesn't have a converter. Just two wires (positive and negative) coming from it. And I don't know if it's rated for 120 volts, but do know for sure it's rated for 12 amps (says so on the box).

I'd prefer to use just one battery and thought wiring in items such as a capacitor would help? Again, I don't know what I'm doing. Just having some fun trying to put a leaf blower to use that was sitting in my garage. I didn't even know I could burn the motor out or create a fire by directly connecting it to the battery.

So, would incorporating other components help? If so, how do I do it?
 
  #9  
Old 07-06-19, 03:05 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
It's a Worx WG520 Turbine 600 electric leaf blower. The link for it is below, which says the voltage rating is 120V~60 HZ and the rated power is 12 amps.

https://www.worx.com/blowers-mulcher...wer-wg520.html
 
  #10  
Old 07-06-19, 03:36 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 2,493
Received 275 Upvotes on 235 Posts
Originally Posted by Guille
Need more blower power.

I'm currently doing an experiment at home with an electrical motor taken out of a plug-in leaf blower. I took the motor out of the blower, connected it to a 12-volt battery, and, as expected, the motor does not work nearly as well as when it was plugged into a power outlet.

The motor is rated for 12 amps and works on (I'm assuming anyway) AC.

Right now, the motor is directly connected to the battery and I'm trying to get the motor to work as powerfully as it can. Similar to when it's plugged into a power outlet (without plugging it into the wall).

So, do any of you know how to do this? Thanks for the help.

P.S.- As you might have guessed, I know nothing about electrical equipment.
"Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
- Wolfgan Pauli, Austrian Physicist-


What you're doing is analogous to a "Bevis and Butthead" episode.
You're grabbing a frog tossing it in the air and hitting it with a baseball bat.
Then you are asking "why doesn't this frog fly like a bird..."

 

Last edited by Hal_S; 07-06-19 at 03:56 PM.
  #11  
Old 07-06-19, 04:40 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
More likely as not this blower uses a brushed "universal" motor with a relatively inexpensive SCR speed control. It may not take a full 120 volts DC for operation but may attain full speed with only about 100 volts DC applied. I'd be surprised if it is a 12 volt DC motor.
 
  #12  
Old 07-06-19, 06:52 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Furd, are you suggesting I try it with a different motor?
 
  #13  
Old 07-07-19, 04:37 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
A "universal" motor is one that has a wound rotor as well as wound field coils. It will run on either AC or DC and is common with small tools and appliances. They will often use a SCR (silicon-controlled rectifier) to convert AC to a variable DC voltage to give speed control.

I'm NOT stating as a fact that this particular blower has a universal motor, only that it would be common for it to have one. I have no idea of what you are trying to accomplish so I can make no specific recommendation.

IF this were a common induction motor (AC only) then it would not run at all when connected to DC but would instead "lock up" and be difficult to impossible to turn the shaft.
 
  #14  
Old 07-07-19, 07:10 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Just out of curiosity, are any of you electrical engineers? Thanks.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: