Getting the shop going


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Old 08-11-19, 10:18 AM
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Getting the shop going

i just moved. At the house is a double 40amp breaker with a service line that runs aprox. 150 ft. to a shop.
May the shop is a breaker panel (brand new) with 20 amp breaker (also new).
I measure the same voltage at both ends of the service line. Same at the single receptacle I have installed. However, when I plug in and turn on a load, the voltage drops to around 5 and the tool will not run.

What could be going on here?
 
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Old 08-11-19, 10:41 AM
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Poor neutral connection or damaged wire underground. Check connections in panels. What is the wire type and size? In conduit or direct buried?
 
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Old 08-11-19, 10:53 AM
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Poor connection. What two points are you measuring? hot ground? hot to neutral?
Is this only a 120 volt feed or is it a 120/240 volt feed?
 
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Old 08-11-19, 03:44 PM
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It WAS a two wire plus ground 240 setup. I decided that the ground wire was most likely bad. I had replaced the exposed section already but I would not be surprised if more of it was trashed.
So, my solution was to use one of the original 6 gage wires as my common. So now itís 120v on a single side of a dual 40amp breaker.
 
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Old 08-11-19, 05:08 PM
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I measure the same voltage at both ends of the service line.
This is normal as voltage drop does not happen (except for the resistance of the wire which is VERY small) until you add a load to the circuit.

I decided that the ground wire was most likely bad.
The ground wire does not have anything to do with the normal operation of a circuit. It is only there for safety and to carry fault current back to the source.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 04:16 AM
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What I called the ground wire was being used as common.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 03:17 PM
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First some terminology:
Hot (ungrounded conductor) Which can be any color other than white(with or without a yellow stripe), gray, green (with or without stripes) or bare.
Neutral (grounded conductor) Which can be white with or without stripes, or gray.
Ground, which can be green, green with a yellow stripe or bare.
There is no common.

You may not use a ground wire as a neutral. You are removing all the safeguards from your wiring system.
 
 

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