Installing new meter box


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Old 10-13-19, 06:07 PM
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Installing new meter box

Hello, I am installing a new meter box and panel to a barn I recently purchased. There are 4 wires coming to the meter underground from the transformer. 3 4/0 aluminum and 1 2/0 aluminum and all have casings. I am wondering where to connect that 2/0 ground cable in my meter box? Do I need to purchase a separate ground bar to install in the box? If so, where would I attach it? Hopefully the picture helps! Thank you! Ryan

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Last edited by PJmax; 10-13-19 at 10:49 PM. Reason: reoriented pictures
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Old 10-13-19, 10:19 PM
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Three 4/0 and one 2/0 sounds like 3-phase 208V 200A....
 
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Old 10-13-19, 10:52 PM
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I agree..... there would be three phase legs and a neutral..... no ground.

You're going to need to check with the power company or check the work order to see what was ordered.
 
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Old 10-14-19, 05:47 AM
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Thanks guys. I swear the electrician told me to order 3 4/0 and 1 2/0 for the line to the transformer. Maybe he meant I just needed a 2/0 ground from the meter box into the ground? I have 200 feet of cable laid out and ready to go in the ground. Am I able to just unravel the ground line from the 200í ?
 
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Old 10-14-19, 03:22 PM
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Typically the neutral is allowed to be smaller in size where you could just unwrap one of the 4/0's.
However.... the smaller cable is usually the last to be added so that means it would be the first to come off. Having three 4/0 cables is going to require ID'ing the neutral.
 
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Old 10-14-19, 04:51 PM
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In my area, the power company is responsible for the wires from the transformer to the meter socket in residential services. However, if there is is a pedestal with a main breaker by the road, then that would be your first overcurrent device and would require two hots, one neutral, one ground.

If there is a ped with a meter, your meter would be redundant.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 10-14-19 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 10-14-19, 04:59 PM
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None of the areas I service have a breaker at the pad. That would require too much common sense. Every time I work on an underground service.... I pay the power company for an underground disconnect at the transformer. One time they opened a splice in a buried vault.
 
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Old 10-14-19, 05:43 PM
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I should have also mentioned that the above post should have read "in residential services" I have edited the above post.

Commercial services are different. They will mostly have a tap box that the electrical contractor will feed the building from.
 
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Old 10-14-19, 07:03 PM
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Iím in central Florida. I asked the power company on three different occasions if they install the service line to my barn. They said they will not do that. The power company did tell me if I run 4 cables to their box they will connect all of them for me. So now Iíll thinking I will just unravel 10í or so of the ground and run in into the main part of my meter box. If I do this would I need a ground rod at my barn? Or will the power company ground suffice?
Thanks for all your comments!
 
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Old 10-14-19, 07:13 PM
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If there is no other fuse or circuit breaker between their connection and the meter, then I would say you only need to run three wires. (Hot, Hot, Neutral) You will need at least two grounds at the barn. Normally this is a water pipe, or rebar, and a driven ground rod (or two). The panel in the picture will have the neutral bus bonded to the steel box via a green screw or strap. And to your first question: The neutral will connect to the bus bar on the far right.

Other notes:
I hope you made sure that panel is approved by your power company. My power companies require a meter socket with a bypass handle. Also, I do not see a main breaker on the panel. If it doesn't have one, you can not have more than six circuit breakers.
 
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Old 10-15-19, 11:21 AM
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The power company did tell me if I run 4 cables to their box they will connect all of them for me.

I think I'd double check with the power company again to be sure what they are providing is single phase service. It really does sound like a 3-phase 4-wire 120/208 volt system.
 
 

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