European electrical

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Old 11-29-19, 09:53 AM
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European electrical

Anybody seen the Asian/European electrical service..?? Does their 240 service have a neutral??
If not does a ground wire complete the circuit on the other side of the load..?? something has to,no??
 
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Old 11-29-19, 12:19 PM
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Dramatically over-simplified

Basic US electric power service is 3 wires- (one leg) which is 120 volt "hot ", a 0-volt "return" and a floating "ground" . Modern house service is 4 wires, (two leg) at 120 volt "hot+" and 120 volt "hot-", (giving 240 volts between the 120+ and 120- legs) with a 0-volt "return" and a floating "ground".

In contrast, common outlets in Europe and Asia are 240 volt with 3 wires, a "hot" at 240 volts, a 0 volt "return" and a floating "ground".

You CAN use a European 240v input- to-ground with an American 240v across-inputs, but you'll have to check the manufacturer's standards about grounding. If the exterior of the appliance is metal-connected-to-return, you could get a 120v +/- shock if the wiring isn't done right.
 
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Old 11-29-19, 02:07 PM
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some people describe the neutrl as a current relief valve when the 2 sides of the transformer are un equal. How would you describe a neutral?
 
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Old 11-29-19, 03:14 PM
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I am not sure what "current relief" means,

Neutral is just the return side of the line.
 
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Old 11-29-19, 05:06 PM
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Neutral is commonly defined as a grounded, load carrying conductor. Yes, Europe uses these👍
 
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Old 11-29-19, 11:27 PM
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A modern 4 wire service is like a sink in a high school.bathroom

You have a ground - the drain in the tile floor, which isn't supposed to carry any current, but is there to "catch" anything that spills.

You have a sink, the flow in from one leg (hot & cold) which should match the flow OUT to the other leg, (the drain in the bottom of the sink).

In this analogy, the neutral/return is the anti-overflow drain towards at the top of the sink- if there is an imbalance between water-in and water out, the neutral lets the excess water drain off.
 
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Old 11-30-19, 07:13 AM
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A 240 volt service in Europe or other 220-250 volt countries typically has two conductors entering the home. I would expect that one of the two conductors is grounded in which case it would be a neutral. Wit just two conductors, ground and neutral are combined as they enter the home.

Older 110-120 volt services in the U.S. also had two conductors entering the house; always one was grounded (is the neutral and also ground).

The modern 120/240 volt service in the U.S. has 3 conductors entering the home, one of which is the combined ground and neutral. Ofteh the latter is also the support (messenger) wire around which the other two are wrapped.

From the main panel (panel or box with the first whole house disconnect in the U.S.) neutral and ground run separately downstream (in branch circuits) to the various outlets and receptacles. Other countries may or may not have standardized the use of a third conductor for grounding..

I would expecct that the 240 volt service in Europe et al is usually sourced from a 3 phase 240/416 volt system with a center (symmetric) neutral/ground. Each home receives just 240 volts from one leg of the 3 phase system plus ground. It is conceivable if not occasionally currently that a home may have two legs plus neutral/ground for a 240/416 or for some configurations a 240/480 volt service.

If plugs and receptacles have two equally sized and oriented prongs/holes then it would be expected that the shell or case or cabinet of appliances and fixtures is not grounded, i.e. not bonded to either current carrying conductor. Should the shell get energized then it would be due to a defect or malfunction just as might occur in the U.S.
 
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