Adding to existing Master Bedroom


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Old 01-03-20, 08:03 AM
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Question Adding to existing Master Bedroom

I have some basic electrical experience that my step-father taught me that was slightly enhanced by a master electrician some years ago during a previous project. My current project will be adding to our master bedroom two (possibly four) recessed LED lights and a dimmer switch to control them. I will be spending some time this weekend up in the attic space tracing back wires and learning as much as I can about the layout. I hope to identify the least used circuit (ceiling fan) so as not to choose a circuit that might already be maxed out. Ultimately, my thought is to add a junction box into the circuit and run the lights and switch off of that.

Are there any suggestions prior to me doing the work that anyone might have?

Best,
Hawkes
 
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Old 01-03-20, 09:46 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Typically it's not beneficial going to the ceiling fan as they are usually switched from a wall switch. If your fan has a wireless control and NO wall switch...... you can get power there.

What does that room currently have a wall switch for ?
Fan...... ceiling light..... switched receptacle ?
 
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Old 01-04-20, 09:52 AM
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My apologies for misdirecting. I wasn't looking to jump off the fan from the switch, but rather the line leading to that circuit. Currently, there are 4 switches in that room. One dual gang controls the fan and the fan light. The other dual gang controls a switched outlet and an exterior backyard overhead light. I plan to find the circuit leading to the ceiling fan, turn it off at the breaker, and locate anything else that goes off with it. Hopefully that circuit will have the least number of loads on it
 
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Old 01-04-20, 10:06 AM
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Ok. Id'ing everything on that circuit is a good idea. You won't be adding much load so it shouldn't overload any circuit you use.

This is one application where a non contact tester works well since you can ID a cable for power without cutting into it or finding its end.
 
 

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