Subpanel definition


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Old 01-03-20, 03:04 PM
S
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Subpanel definition

Hello, looking for some interpretation of definitions before I call the inspector for my inspection. He told me I needed to separate the neutral and grounds. After looking into everything, I think I understand, except for the definition of main panel versus subpanel.
I have a service drop to the house, down to a meter on the outside of the house, and then 6 inches away there is a box with a single breaker. From there, the wires penetrate the house wall and travel to the 'fuse box/circuit breaker panel', where 'blown circuits' are reset.
My question is, is this circuit panel in the house, with all the breakers in it, actually classified as a 'subpanel' for the purposes of grounding? The subpanel diagrams pinned at the top of this forum seem to indicate that #4 (same building) is what I am trying to do? The main wire that comes to this 'subpanel' is a 4-wire supply cable. The ground wire is a huge stranded aluminum wire. If I add a ground bar to separate the neutral and ground conductors, there is no way that is going to fit. Do I need to add a grounding lug?

If you are able to help, thank you.
 
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Old 01-03-20, 03:19 PM
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Main panel is where first means of disconnect (main breaker) is installed. Any panel after that is sub-panel and ground and neutral has to be separated.

The first breaker panel by the meter will be your main breaker. If that single breaker inside is not a main disconnect, then you have another problem. You need a main breaker first.
 
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Old 01-03-20, 04:11 PM
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The definition does include panel. You could have a disconnect at the meter. In that case ALL panels after the disconnect are sub panels.
In summary, all panels after the first means of disconnect are sub panels and need four wire feeds.
 
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Old 01-03-20, 11:16 PM
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Thank you for clarifying that. The overcurrent device in the box at the meter cuts power to the entire subpanel - I assume that is termed the 'main breaker'?

I replaced the subpanel in the house last year to add more breaker capacity for the addition we're building. I have a SquareD QO panel, and there is no separate ground bar. The two bars in there are rodded together from the neutral lug. There was a position large enough for the grounding conductor. I realize I need to separate the neutral and ground. The size of the grounding wire is causing the problem for me.

Is there a grounding bar for a QO load center which has a lug on it?

Thank you
 
  #5  
Old 01-03-20, 11:43 PM
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Ground bars are available in different configurations. Some have several large conductor holes.
You can also use lug kit that attaches via two bus screws. This one says for neutral but can be used for neutral or ground.

Add a Lug
 
 

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