Wire in cabinet under sink


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Old 04-15-23, 10:08 AM
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Wire in cabinet under sink

Hi there, I had a new dishwasher put in. The original was hard wired, and the new one has a plug.

Right now the wire from the switch for the dishwasher is coming through the back of the cabinet under the sink and waiting to be wired to an outlet.

I just wanted to check my plan with some experts. I was going to run the wire through a flexible conduit into a box that is mounted to the side of the cabinet near the left cabinet door. Seemed wrong to leave the wire in the cabinet space without some protection. Any guidance on if I should use plastic or metal conduit? Also, I couldn't seem to find any plastic gang boxes that allowed me to fasten it to the surface of the cabinet (at the local hardware store), so I'm assuming I can just use a metal box?

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 04-15-23, 11:37 AM
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If you are using a metal box then I would recommend keeping everything metal. You should be able to buy a short section of Flexible Metal Conduit for your project.
 
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Old 04-15-23, 11:38 AM
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The conduit would only be used for protection purposes.
Smurf tube is ok for mechanical protection.
So is plastic flex.
A metal box would be ok. The flex could be connected directly to the box.

Something like this..... PVC conduit whip
 
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Old 04-15-23, 02:07 PM
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When dishwasher is hardwired, wire is usually pulled behind dishwasher not into sink cabinet. Also, they are usually not switched.
Are you sure you are not looking at garage disposal wire?

If the wire you see is in fact for dishwasher, there is no need to install junction box so close to front. I would mount it where the wire enters the sink cabinet. Then, there is no need for conduit. If you want to make it cleaner and gain some space, you can cut back of the cabinet and drywall to install old work (remodel) junction box. Then your receptacle will be flush with back of the cabinet.
Also, dishwashers are now required to be on GFCI protected receptacle. So, you should install GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 04-16-23, 03:43 AM
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If you decide to provide gfi protection, the gfi needs to be readily accessible and not blocked by cleaning supplies etc.
 
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Old 04-16-23, 09:01 AM
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the gfi needs to be readily accessible and not blocked by cleaning supplies etc.
Readily accessible is defined as being able to access it without the use of tools, climbing over, under, or removing obstacles, or requiring ladders.

​​​​​​​In my opinion, removing small cleaning supplies is not an obstacle. I have never had an issue with an inspector locating a GFCI in a sink cabinet.
 
 

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