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How critical is it to run a ground green conductor to a switch?

How critical is it to run a ground green conductor to a switch?


  #1  
Old 03-27-24, 12:09 PM
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How critical is it to run a ground green conductor to a switch?

Metal switch box with either NMB or MC wiring.

How critical is it to run a green ground conductor to each switch?

I have a three gang box with three toggle switches. One is for a switched receptacle (floor lamp), one for a ceiling light and one for a three way switch. There are three conduits coming into the box, each with a green conductor. That's three, then one green conductor bonded to the metal box, then one green conductor to each of the switch, that's a total of 7 conductors in that box spliced together, and it's thus divided into two large wire nuts with a short jumper between the two, a total of 8 green conductors.

Now I want to change the ceiling light into a fan/light which means a larger "boxy" switch, and the three way light into a dimming three way also a boxy switch, and the existing wires in the box are getting a bit crowded,

I am thinking may be I will skip the green conductor to each of the three switches, and just splice the three green conductors coming from each conduit, plus a short one to the box. Is that kosher?

Or do I need to use self grounding switches so they connect to the metal box?
 
  #2  
Old 03-27-24, 08:30 PM
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do I need to use self grounding switches so they connect to the metal box?
This is easiest and probably the best solution. Many dimmer switches come with self grounding clips.
 
  #3  
Old 03-27-24, 09:43 PM
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[size=19px]Dismount each switch and use a meter to check for continuity between the ground screw and yoke of each switch. You may find your switches are self-grounding on metal boxes.[/size]
 
  #4  
Old 03-28-24, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by MiamiCuse
How critical is it to run a green ground conductor to each switch?
Really depends on the setup- for your application with multiple boxes, you can probably use the grounding clips.

In contrast, when I was a kid we our dining room had 2 switches by a backdoor- one for an outside light, one for the ceiling light. Both switches had 1970s pseudo colonial-militia figure done with hammered metal switch covers.
Well, turns out one box & switch was reverse wired and not grounded properly- so, if you went to flip on both switches and happened to touch both metal switch covers - you got a 120v surprise.
 
  #5  
Old 03-28-24, 06:10 PM
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Switches that are mounted to a grounded metal box are not required to have a grounding conductor connected to them. NEC 404.9(B)(1)
 
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