Table sizes for Craftsman radial arm saw

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Old 01-14-17, 07:49 PM
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Table sizes for Craftsman radial arm saw

I have an older Craftsman 10inch radial arm saw and need to replace the table. I am looking for the original table dimensions. The original rear, spacer, fence and front tables are long gone and I'd like to get back to the original dimensions. The manual does not provide them It is Model 113.199200 or 250.
If you have one or have the dimensions please send me a PM (private message)

Thanks
 

Last edited by PJmax; 01-14-17 at 08:23 PM. Reason: removed email address
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Old 01-14-17, 08:24 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You don't want your email address on a highly visible board like this as you'd get nailed with spam. You can set it up in your bio that PM will be sent to your email.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 04:16 AM
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This will give you the dimensions, but try to use something besides pressboard for the top. Good HDF solid surface will outlast the pressboard. I have mine set in the back of my shop and built a 12' long by 40" deep top with legs to keep it stationary. I used 2x6 lumber for the top, which would be overkill for regular mobile use. CRAFTSMAN CRAFTSMAN 10-INCH RADIAL SAW Parts | Model 113199200 | Sears PartsDirect
 
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Old 01-15-17, 05:05 AM
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As Chandler mentioned I replaced mine with a much longer top. The finger screws that you use to tighten the rear guide board have two positions and mine had a spacer board to insert when using the rear position. As memory serves me the choice of stop board location depends upon straight cuts or angled. But a longer top really helps, if you have the room.

Bud
 
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Old 01-15-17, 09:10 AM
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One thing that will help you set up and make a new top is that when completed and the saw is fully forward, the blade should be about 1/4" clear of touching any wood placed against the rest.
 
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Old 07-01-18, 09:24 AM
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Bud: I have new-to-me mechanical tachometer. I want to be certain the tachometer is accurate. I read 3600 rpm on the shaft directly driving the blade on my R.A.S. Is 3600 rpm the rated speed for this saw motor?
 
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Old 07-02-18, 02:46 PM
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Found an answer:
10 inch radial arm saw model #11323111
Manual on the saw:
Motor Specifications
The A-C motor used in this saw is a capacitor-start,
non-reversible type having the following specifications:
Voltage ............................ 120
Amperes ............................ 12.5
Hertz (cycles) ............................ 60
Phase ................................ Single
RPM ................................. 3450
Rotation as viewed
from saw blade end ................. Clockwise
Use only blades marked for at least 3450 rpm.
Need to be aware of the saws safety recall notice also.
Please copy and paste the below link into your web browser:
http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2001/...oebuck-and-Co/
The recalled Craftsman® 8-, 8¼-, 9- and 10-inch radial arm saws have a model number beginning with 113,
usually located on the base of the saw. The brand name "Craftsman®" and store name "Sears" are written on the saws.
 
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Old 07-02-18, 03:21 PM
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I had one of those when I moved I gave to son in law. Wish I still had it.
 
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Old 07-02-18, 03:25 PM
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I have this same model/ Mounted on a large long table. Due for a total re calibration.
 
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Old 07-02-18, 05:37 PM
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I have one of these, got it from my old boss. Just used it yesterday to trim a cutting board. Cut like butter.
 
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Old 07-03-18, 12:58 PM
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I hope I do not seem to come across as an ass here, but I have to ask, why invest anything in a radial arm saw at all? A modern dual-bevel compound sliding miter saw will give you options that a radial cannot, most importantly accuracy and safety. Unless you are constantly cutting very wide stock, you are much better suited to a slide saw with a good infeed-outfeed, and a proper table saw with the same. In my 45+ years of woodworking, I have seen more accidents occur with radial's than with any other type of shop equipment bar none. There is a reason that practically nobody makes them anymore.
If you insist on using it, I hope you are experienced with these issues and the saw itself. If not, try and sell it.
Once again, sorry for butting in but I felt it necessary to do so.
 
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Old 07-03-18, 06:37 PM
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A modern dual-bevel compound sliding miter saw will give you options that a radial cannot
Yes, like a wallet that is $600 lighter.
 
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Old 07-04-18, 04:26 AM
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I have to agree that a table saw probably is the better choice for most wood working projects. But when I bought my radial arm saw price was a factor and I'm not sorry. I'v built many a cabinet and a full size bed with built in draws and all mitered corners. That was over 35 years ago and that saw was the one I could afford at the time. Don't use it much any more, but it does the job when needed. I also bought mitered chop saw for framing projects.
 
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Old 07-04-18, 08:59 PM
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I have that exact model AND a Makita sliding compound saw. The RAS gets far more use. Especially handy for hogging out half-lap joints in face frames and plowing shelf dadoes in cabinet sides. Have not found a way to do that with a chop saw.

BTW--old thread.
 
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