Rotary tool vs drill?


  #1  
Old 12-02-17, 05:46 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Rotary tool vs drill?

What can a rotary tool do that a drill can't? Google what a rotary is, because you probably are not sure.
 

Last edited by BurgerKing; 12-02-17 at 06:27 PM.
  #2  
Old 12-02-17, 06:16 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,062
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,326 Posts
Not every drill has a hammer feature. A plain old drill just spins. A hammer drill spins and can be set to spin and hammer. Used when drilling into concrete. But most hammer drills are light duty.... lots of beats per minute, but not much power behind the hammering. Rotary hammers are like hammer drills on steroids. They all have at least 3 settings... drill, hammer drill, and hammer only. When set on hammer only, they are like a mini jackhammer. And rotary hammers (rotary drills) come in various sizes... 7/8, 1 1/8, 1 1/2... the bigger the rotary hammer the more of a punch it will pack.

I have a 1 1/8" rotary hammer, it is good for light chipping, and any hole you want to drill in concrete quickly. But they do not take the place of a jackhammer. You could use one to break open a small 12x12 hole that you have cut in a basement floor... but you certainly would not do a LOT of demo with one. Good for chipping off and saving bricks... good for chipping up ceramic tile off a floor. Light chipping. Kind of like an air chisel, if you have it set on "hammer only".

By "rotary tool", you don't mean something like a Dremel, do you? Oh my gosh, I bet you do.
 
  #3  
Old 12-02-17, 06:29 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Haha, rotary tool mean the stuff that Dremel make. it looks like a drill without the handle.
 
  #4  
Old 12-02-17, 06:48 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,062
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,326 Posts
Well that's even easier to answer. A drill- corded or cordless- is for drilling holes and turning screws... it turns at a low speed compared to a Dremel, but has way more torque than a Dremel does. Dremels spin VERY fast, can be used for detail work like intricate wood carving, fine metal grinding or cutting... metal polishing... things like that. That's why the dentist has a little air rotary tool he puts in your mouth... not his 20V Dewalt drill.

You would also never put a big drill bit or a Phillips bit in a Dremel. You don't turn screws with them. And if you did drill a hole with a Dremel it would be a very tiny one.

I have never needed or wanted a Dremel in my life.
 
  #5  
Old 12-02-17, 06:53 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, sleep.
Would u know the diff between a grinder and a buffer/polisher then? Is it that grinder is torque and low rotation speed, and buffer is low torque but high rotation speed?
 
  #6  
Old 12-02-17, 07:02 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,062
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,326 Posts
Depends. Grinder and buffer can mean different tools. But there are some overlapping uses.

An angle grinder... you hold in your hand and the blade shaft is perpendicular to the work. 4 1/2" angle grinder or 7" angle grinder. Generally they are used for grinding or cutting... but you can also get buffing wheels to put on angle grinders.

A bench grinder... it is usually mounted to a bench and it has a shaft that allows you to put a wheel on the left and one on the right, giving you the option to put a variety of wheels on either side. Course grinding wheel, fine grinding wheel, wire brush... or even a buffing wheel. They are used for grinding, brushing and buffing... but are not usually for cutting. You could use a bench grinder to grind or buff any object you can hold in your hand.

But if you want a buffer... it ONLY buffs and polishes... and yes, at a much lower speed. Like what you would use to wax and buff your car, for example. You would not use an angle grinder to buff your car... at least I hope you wouldn't... unless you work in a body shop and are using the right kind of tool and attachment.

And a buffing machine would be a large buffer used for floors only.
 
  #7  
Old 12-02-17, 08:16 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,449
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I rarely use my dremel tool. It is good for cutting off/shortening machine screws and cutting metal. You have to be careful using a cut-off wheel because they will shatter easily.
I have also used it to detail my motorcycle. There's a small buffing wheel available, Maybe 3/8" or less diameter.
If you want to buff something large, I would choose a buffer over an angle grinder. The only reason I own an angle grinder is to cut into cast iron pipe or doing serious cutting into heavy metal.
 
  #8  
Old 12-02-17, 09:49 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
Which tool to use depends entirely upon what you are doing. I received a Dremel number 2 "Moto-Tool" for Christmas when I was about 14 years old. I used that tool on many different things until it finally bit the dust after almost fifty years of use. Now I use a pneumatic pencil grinder and I honestly would be lost without it.

BUT, I do not use the pencil grinder to do anything but work on small or precise applications. It is NOT a heavy work tool.

I have two 4-1/2 inch grinders, an older Milwaukee and a newer Harbor Freight model. I use the Milwaukee exclusively for grinding welds and the HF I mostly use with an 1/8 inch thick cut-off wheel for cutting steel. Even more than the pencil grinder I would be lost without these tools.

I have two Ingersoll-Rand die grinders, a straight one and one with a 90 degree head. The straight one is an industrial grinder with more power than most people could imagine for such a small tool and the angle grinder is also more powerful than the typical home shop tool. Both of these tools turn up around 20,000 rpm and are basically a Dremel on steroids.

I have two Jet 8 inch pedestal grinders, one of them with a wire wheel. I bought an 8 inch Harbor Freight grinder but it is a total joke and hardly even worth trying to sell.

For drilling I have an old Milwaukee 1/4 inch rated drill with a 1/2 inch chuck. It is my "go to" drill when I need a lot of power. I also have a Black & Decker 12 volt portable drill that I use often but don't require a lot of power. For use in my metal working shop I have three pneumatic drills, a Harbor Freight angle drill with a 3/8 inch chuck that is good for tight places but not a lot of power, a 1/4 inch Rockwell that is a good general-purpose drill and a 1/4 inch reversible Ingersoll-Rand (with a 3/8 inch chuck) for heavy work. I like having multiple drill motors when tapping as I can have the tap drill in one and the clearance drill in another merely switching tools instead of drill bits.

My needs for a hammer drill are very few and far between. When I was volunteering at the historical museum I needed one on a regular basis so bought a Milwaukee and donated it to the cause.
 
  #9  
Old 12-03-17, 01:25 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,110
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Well, while we're at it. How about the difference between a buffer/polisher, buffer/sander, sander/grinder, 7" angle grinder (though I never have referred to them that way, as an angle grinder I mean) and 4 1/2" angle grinder. And of course there are air polishers, air sanders, air angle grinders, air straight die grinders, and air angle die grinders. Each does what it does best compared to pushing another tool into that role.

Brian...
Do you use the reinforced cutting wheels or the super thin oxide(?) ones? I'm guessing the latter? Though they are nice for cutting very thin slots, I won't have one in the box. For just the reason you describe. Got a nice little bleeding cut just below my eye when one of those let go. I'll use my Exacto hack saw if I need it super thin.
 
  #10  
Old 12-03-17, 01:55 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm the OP and I was trying to ask the difference between an "angle/orbital grinder vs angle/orbital sander". I'm not asking about comparing other forms of grinders and sanders that obviously look different.
This conversation is getting messy and I should not have asked about "grinder vs sander" in a "rotary vs drill" thread. Can a moderator please help us out and move the part of the conversation about "grinder vs sander" into a new question.
 
  #11  
Old 12-03-17, 08:22 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,449
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
To me an angle grinder and angle sander are very similar. These tools are used only for serious sanding, like removing paint from wood.

If you want to both sand and grind I would use the angle grinder with a flexible pad attachment. If you want to sand only I would use a sander.

IMO the sander is job specific, the angle grinder is adaptable but it is not random orbital, at least I haven't seen a orbital grinder.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: