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Old 12-03-17, 01:58 PM
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Type saw info

I need to cut some silicon carbide kiln shelves. These are not the older type but the Advancer shelves - much harder than the normal silicon carbide. A diamond blade is a must.

My problem is I need to cut some of these to a round shape from the present square shape.

A wet cut tile saw will do the job but cutting a perfect round shape is not possible so I am thinking of possibility using a vertical band saw.

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Tks - jb
 
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Old 12-03-17, 02:27 PM
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You might want to look into using a diamond coated jigsaw blade.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 02:29 PM
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You could check local stone/granite dealers to see what they would charge to cut them. You can also look for industrial fabricators, someone with a water jet would be perfect and if you're near Burlington I know a shop that might help you out.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 02:45 PM
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Water jet is a great idea... Especially if you want them to be perfect.
 
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Old 12-04-17, 06:24 AM
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type saw

Tks for the replies - I appreciate it.

I have over 1,000 of these shelves that must be cut so have to do it myself - cost to have someone else is not an option.

That takes water jet out of the picture due to equipment cost. A diamond tile saw will do a good job on straight cuts but not on curves.

The suggestion of a jig saw is interesting - anyone have a thought on how long a blade would last keeping in mind that these shelves are one of the hardest materials on the planet - think harder than a carborundum grinding wheels?

And maybe a reciprocating saw - but no water on both is a problem.

One problem I see with jig saw is that it is not a wet cut which a diamond blade needs for blade life.

Again, tks - jb
 

Last edited by jebjeb; 12-04-17 at 07:36 AM.
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Old 12-04-17, 07:32 AM
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At that quantity you should contact Advancer and get a cost for the pieces cut to size as you are well within commercial quantities. If you must cut your own I think you will be cheaper to have a shop with the right equipment do the work. Depending on the shelf material and the blades you choose you may only get one piece per blade. Then you have to figure your time and wear and tear on your saw. If it takes you 5 minutes to cut and clean up one circle that's over 80 houirs of labor. And, most homeowner grade tools are not meant for that duty cycle so you might have your saw die part way through the project.
 
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Old 12-04-17, 08:09 AM
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Dane, I already have 1200 of the Advancers - picked them up used in near new condition from industry. The cost of the same shelf retail is over $400.00 each.

As I will be re-sailing them to people that need different sizes/shapes to fit their kilns I am looking for a way to do the job.

Wet diamond tile saws will work without a problem for straight cuts - which will be the majority of them - so trying to find the best and cost effective way to cut round ones. If a cheap diamond jig saw blade would last for one shelf that is a small cost overall - a more expensive one to last several shelves even better.

Don't think cutting them dry - heat buildup would ruin a blade quickly - is practical. Anyone know of a way to use water with a jig saw?

Tks - jb
 
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Old 12-04-17, 08:43 AM
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Why can't you wet cut? Drill a 3/32" hole in the top of a water bottle and spray a little with one hand as you cut with the other. Use a gfci adapter in any plugin. No idea how long how the blades would last... You would have to try it.

The diamond scroll saw blades I have seen say they are for up to 1/4" tile or glass. How thick is the stuff you are trying to cut?
 
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Old 12-04-17, 09:11 AM
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Sleep, that is an idea - keeping water out of motor would be a problem.

I am cutting 5/16 shelves.

Here are two that seem like good buys -

Tacklife PJS02A 6.7-Amp Laser Jig Saw
https://www.worx.com/20v-axis-recip-...SAAEgIzpfD_BwE

There is one that is corded like the second one but I can't find it right now.

jb
 
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