rolling table saw stand

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-03-19, 07:51 AM
6
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
rolling table saw stand

Hi Guys -

I just bought my first table saw. To be honest, table saws scare the c**p outta me, but I gotta have one for the stuff I'm doing. I've gotten pretty creative over the years using jigs, fences etc with a circular saw, but accuracy and repeatability are an issue. Not to mention the setup time. PIA.

Anyways, I have a rigid rolling miter saw stand for my sliding, dual bevel miter saw. It is FANTASTIC (using a hercules dual bevel saw from harbor freight.) This is a REALLY nice saw (way better than my Rigid, which finally crapped out)

I'm pretty sure I could mount the table saw to the stand, but am wondering if putting the table saw on this stand would put it up to high? Has anyone else put a table saw on this the rigid rolling miter saw stand?

Thanks!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-03-19, 08:20 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,985
Received 665 Votes on 615 Posts
You are pushing boards through a table saw which creates a tipping issue. You aren't pushing anything on a miter saw stand. That's why table saw stands are lower and have a wider more stable footprint. Plus I bet it would be way too high to be comfortable to use on the miter stand.
 
  #3  
Old 12-03-19, 10:00 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,742
Received 95 Votes on 84 Posts
Has anyone else put a table saw on this the rigid rolling miter saw stand?
Well, I have my table saw mounted in the top of a 96 gallon rolling trash can. I use it primarily for small pieces, cutting 2x4s etc.

The trash container puts the saw at a convenient height (for me), catches almost all of the sawdust, makes it easy to move the saw around, and if you crank the blade all the way down the lid closes.

The table saw is supported by four threaded rods going through the container.
Different sized nuts threaded on the rods allow for fine-tuning the level.
Wedges of packing foam hold the table saw dead center.

I glued strips of grippy black-foam insulation around the perimeter of the trashcan, made a plywood "plinth" to stand on, which is connect to the front "lifting bar" with rubber truck cover bungee cords. When you use the saw, you stand on the plywood plinth, your weight pins trashcan to the ground, and the grippy foam keeps anything from moving.
 
  #4  
Old 12-03-19, 11:56 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,512
Received 364 Votes on 340 Posts
I use it primarily for small pieces, cutting 2x4s etc.
Ouch, a table saw for cutting 2x4's, you really need to pick up a cheap miter saw for that!
 
  #5  
Old 12-03-19, 01:16 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 706
Received 29 Votes on 27 Posts
I guess like many things, it's a matter of preference. For me, I'd get a stand designed to support the tool I'm using and mine is custom made - by me. So, my recommendation is to make your stand. Beyond that, I'd like to hear why you'd prefer a rolling stand unless you're a contractor..
 
  #6  
Old 12-03-19, 04:01 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,742
Received 95 Votes on 84 Posts
Originally Posted by Marq1
Ouch, a table saw for cutting 2x4's, you really need to pick up a cheap miter saw for that!
Meh, if it's just a few pieces and a 90 or 45 degree cut, I'll just use a hand saw.
(Now, my grandfather owned the local lumberyard, so I inherited a nice shop full of rip-saws, cross-cut saws, jack-saws, back-saws, coping saws, jig saws and a few I don't know the name for.)

But, when I'm
- cutting a precise angle
- doing 20 identical pieces,
- squaring a branch or sapling into dimensional lumber (~15 acres of various hardwood trees = never having to buy home-project lumber from the big-box-store)

So, that table saw in a rolly-trashcan and a 12 AWG gauge extension cord comes in handy.
Roll it over to where you're working, or back into the maple / locust grove to turn saplings / branches into tool handles.

Aside- dry honey locust WILL actually throw sparks and is so hard that it dulls any blade except carbide. That wood is harder than copper, aluminum, or cast iron. Beautiful grain though.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 12-03-19 at 04:27 PM.
  #7  
Old 12-04-19, 02:53 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,635
Received 312 Votes on 278 Posts
I've only cut locust for firewood or fence posts. It cuts well while it's still good and green but let it set a week and you get sparks with a chainsaw. Makes great firewood - very little ash.
 
  #8  
Old 12-04-19, 05:55 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,512
Received 364 Votes on 340 Posts
or back into the maple / locust grove to turn saplings / branches into tool handles.
And your using the same table saw as a mill to process timber?

Fricking amazing!
 
  #9  
Old 12-04-19, 07:01 AM
6
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies guys. I'm not a contractor, but I like being able to move the saw around and being able to fold it all up to conserve space in the garage.

I really liked the functionality of the rigid miter saw stand, hence the question of its usability for a table saw.

I don't know if rigid sells their table saw stand separately, can't seem to find it. So, I may opt to go with the dewalt stand, or maybe Bosch, but that one is pretty pricey for what it is.

Anyways, thanks for the help.
 
  #10  
Old 12-04-19, 08:34 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,742
Received 95 Votes on 84 Posts
Originally Posted by Marq1
] And your using the same table saw as a mill to process timber?
Yes.
But I wouldn't call it "timber."
I'm only squaring off sections of 2' to 3' diameter saplings for small stuff, post-hole digger handle, wooden bench slats.

Right beside the barn/workshop is an acre of Norway maple saplings: they grew at the same time. That's an acre of straight-skinny-poles, 15'-25' tall, only 2"-5" in diameter, straight grain, no knots.

That means many of them have 6' or 8' segments that are arrow straight, constant diameter, so just need to square them up to use them.
 
  #11  
Old 12-04-19, 08:34 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,985
Received 665 Votes on 615 Posts
Hard to beat the Bosch stand.
 
  #12  
Old 12-04-19, 11:29 AM
6
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
X -

You have experience with the Bosch? Benefits over the Dewalt? I'm not a big fan of having to snap out the legs on the dewalt.
 
  #13  
Old 12-04-19, 12:06 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,985
Received 665 Votes on 615 Posts
Exactly. Yes, my old work saw was the Bosch 4100. It was so sweet to roll around/ load and unload.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: