Angle grinder cut-off wheel


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Old 04-17-23, 10:21 AM
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Angle grinder cut-off wheel

Over the years I have used my Milwaukee angle grinder with a 4-1/2" fiber abrasive wheel for cutting mostly thin (1/8" or less) steel. These are $3 - $4 wheels and I seem to go through a lot of wheels and at least half from breaking. Maybe I'm trying to be too aggressive? Anyway, I'm seeing steel diamond grit wheels for metal cutting on HD's website for around $20 and I'm wondering if these would last a lot longer and be worth the extra money. Also any gotcha's I should be aware of?

FYI, I got to thinking about a diamond blade when a bought a masonry cutting diamond blade for a bathroom remodel. That one wheel cut through ceramic tile wainscot over a 3/4" mud setting bed over metal lath for the whole bathroom! .
 
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Old 04-17-23, 10:49 AM
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How you use a grinding or cut off wheel has a huge impact on how long it lasts. If you are breaking wheels that is a definite sign you are doing something wrong, most likely putting a side load on the disk. A diamond disk will last longer and are much less likely to shatter or break.
 
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Old 04-17-23, 11:11 AM
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So a lot depends on the blade thickness.

The thinner blades (up to 1/8") work great for thin sheetmetal, think body panels, but if your cutting 1/8" thick steel, which is pretty thick for an abrasive wheel you might want to look for something heavier/different to keep from breaking!
 
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Old 04-17-23, 11:29 AM
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Marq1 when you say "look for something heavier/different", do you think the diamond blade is a good option? Any other options?

I should add, when I was cutting 16 ga. steel studs, the abrasive blade would sometimes bind and break the blade.
 
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Old 04-17-23, 06:04 PM
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Diamond blades do last a lot longer and a very durable. They just cut slower. I have diamond blades in my grinder and my chop saw.
 
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Old 04-18-23, 06:07 AM
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When I get up to anything thicker that 18 ga I opt for the plasma cutter, I might look at a diamond blade myself for those times that a quick cut would take longer than the time to drag out the cutter and hook it all up!

I will say that I have diamond blades in all my wood working tools and they are around 6 years old and cut hard woods like butter but they are pricey!
 
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Old 04-23-23, 10:45 AM
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Update: I bought a diamond cut-off wheel for steel. Works great and looks like new after a good 45 minutes of cutting steel tubing. You were right Tolyn Ironhand, it is a lot slower, but I'm retired, what else do I have to do?! Thanks everyone!
 
 

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