Replacing a smoke detector question.

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Old 12-28-17, 09:23 AM
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Replacing a smoke detector question.

Looking for some advice.... I have an older two story home with gas furnace in the basement. Recently purchased a standard wired smoke detector and installed it at the highest point at the top of the stairs. My other detector is installed bottom of the stairs coming up from the basement. The lower unit needs replacing and intend to get a wired detector that will also monitor carbon dioxide. My question is does this need to be installed up stairs or at the basement level? Many thanks.
 
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Old 12-28-17, 04:51 PM
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If you have fuel burning appliances, the ideal is both close to the CO source, and also close to the sleeping areas. In a multi-level house, on each floor is best practice.
 
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Old 12-28-17, 04:57 PM
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You should definitely have CO detectors in sleeping areas as Ron suggested. I prefer standalone detectors that plug into wall outlets over the combo fire alarm/CO units, mainly because CO is heavier than air, so a low mounted detector will alert much sooner than one on the ceiling.
 
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Old 12-29-17, 09:36 AM
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Thanks Dave and Ron, If CO is heaver than air then the best place to have the CO detector is low in the furnace room. We have a stand alone NSI CO detector in the bed room and is over 10 years old and has never beeped except for low battery. Is there anyway to check a CO detector?
 
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Old 12-29-17, 09:13 PM
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The life span for the sensor in a CO detector is 5-6 years, so it"s probably pretty toast. There actually is a marked expiration date on these units.

Most home centers stock a canned spray that emulates carbon monoxide for testing these devices.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 01:33 PM
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Thanks Ron, The date on the co detector is 2005, got it from a friend and thought that was the start date.... Just purchased a new photo smoke detector with co detector also so should be set. Just a thought, if I use the spray co and the unit operates may I still use it if I test it regularly or if I go blind? ;-)

Dave
 
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Old 12-30-17, 04:36 PM
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Basically, any CO sensor older than 5-6 years old is on borrowed time. You can test it, and if it function, _today_.

I still recommend starting fresh. Life safety isn't something to cheap out on...
 
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Old 12-31-17, 10:15 AM
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I hear you Ron,
I'm 71 and up to two years ago I never had a CO detector.
It makes you wonder what other detectors we need, time will tell..
Happy New Year
Dave (estam)
 
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Old 12-31-17, 10:46 AM
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A had bought two Kidde CO detectors. They were the plug in the wall type with lifetime battery. They had an expiration date of 7 years from first use. When I hit 7 years and 1 month.... the detector started beeping a low battery beep and on the display it said "replace". Could not silence it.

A week later..... same thing with the other unit.
 
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Old 12-31-17, 11:49 AM
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The better units do have that "nag" feature.

The sensor mechanism does use a chemical reaction, and entropy has not yet been repealed...
 
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