Safely installing external poe cam on outside of home


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Old 02-09-19, 02:23 PM
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Safely installing external poe cam on outside of home

Hi All,

I would like to install a poe cam (Ring Stick up Cam) on the outside of my home and want to make sure I do this correctly. I plan on using a Cat 6 utp patch cable from the camera through PVC conduit inside to my basement and immediately connect to a Ubiquity ethernet surge protector. I will bound the surge protector to a nearby outlet. From the surge protector I will run utp back to my poe switch.

I thought about using a Cat 6 shielded cable from the Cam to the surge protector but they are stiff and the Ring cam uses a plastic rj45 jack so I don’t think (could be wrong) it would make any difference. Ring does not offer any guidance other than using cat 5 or above for connection. Any thoughts are appreciated. thanks
 

Last edited by bob_m; 02-09-19 at 03:49 PM.
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Old 02-09-19, 02:50 PM
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No need to run shielded when using UTP cable. That's the reason for the twisted pairs.
 
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Old 02-09-19, 02:54 PM
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Ok, do you think it is a good idea to use ethernet surge projection close to ingress of the cable? thanks
 
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Old 02-09-19, 04:57 PM
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I've never used one on any of my outdoor camera installs. It couldn't hurt anything.
There really isn't any danger of a surge from an outside camera.
If it's lightning you're worried about..... nothing will stop it.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 01:51 PM
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It's something of a "belt and suspenders" choice. Even here in "land of lightning" FL, a close lightning strike is more likely to damage the NVR or power injector by coming in via earth ground. The twisted pair architecture of the cable is a pretty good defense against induced voltage, generally.

Direct or near direct hits (if you can see the bolt hit the ground) will always have potential bad results.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 06:45 PM
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thanks to you both for your insight,. -Bob
 
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Old 02-19-19, 04:43 AM
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I'm running a ring poe stick up camera using a cat6 shielded cable connected to a powerline Poe adapter in my garage for power and signal. The system works great. I ran the cable from the outlet up into the attic and then drilled a hole to feed the wire through the wall near the peak. I'd post pictures if I can figure out how from my phone.
 
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Old 02-19-19, 06:52 AM
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If you have an IPhone, just click on the "Go Advanced" button under the Quick Reply box. If you have an Android, there seems to be a problem uploading pics with that. If you want, you can upload them to any pic hosting site (except tinypic), and put the link here instead.
 
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Old 02-19-19, 08:27 AM
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I had to select desktop mode to get the advanced button. I'm running powerline networking along with wifi access points throughout the house. I have a powerline Poe adapter in the garage with the wire feed into the attic and through the front wall stucco near the peak.
 
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Old 02-19-19, 01:08 PM
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Just remember that what you pay for is what you get. Don't go cheap on the wire, use only CAT6 and above. Especially for video, bandwidth requirements. I have several POE devices at my work that I have added power injectors onto, and have not had any problems. The plastic RJ45s are fine enough for 24VDC. I believe that un-shielded cable and connectors are good until 36VDC, but I know that the standards are changing for low-power cabling. There is also a distance cap on POE. I try to keep the power supply within 50ft of the device. And that is actual cable run feet not logical feet. That might be a little harder to get that close to a device in a residence, but the actual max distance is around 150ft.

And just for reference read Cable Installing website article on on running POE equipment: Five keys to successful POE deployment at https://www.cablinginstall.com/artic...eployment.html on running POE equipment. Its a little dated, but the concepts, concerns, and questions can be answered with out getting into all the technical specifications.
 
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Old 02-19-19, 05:02 PM
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At this time almost everybody is jumping on the Cat6 bandwagon but Cat5E is perfectly adequate for most applications..... especially a single camera. UTP type cables can carry up to 125vdc max and approx 50vdc max in POE applications. The biggest issue with a POE camera is how much current it requires. Each device should list the maximum cable length used for proper performance.

If you are buying new..... go with Cat6 but no reason not to use Cat5E if you have it.
 
 

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