Smoke Alarm Age


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Old 03-20-19, 07:28 PM
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Smoke Alarm Age

I know you are supposed to replace your smoke alarms after they have been in service for 10 years.

My question is this: I came across some smoke alarms that are dated 2005, but they have never been opened and are still in the sealed package. Would these detectors still be good and okay to use?
 
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Old 03-20-19, 07:40 PM
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Yes..... they would still be good. The only issue would be that newer models have become more sensitive in detecting smoke. For the price of smoke detectors I'd consider new. If you do use them.... write on the back the date they were put into service.
 
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Old 03-20-19, 07:53 PM
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Thanks for the suggestion of writing date of install on the back.

These are AC/DC interconnected alarms so they aren't the inexpensive battery models, although they, too, have come down in price over the years.
 
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Old 03-20-19, 08:04 PM
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Glad you mentioned they were AC/battery units. Don't mix them with newer units.
I've found that units more than approx 4 years apart can have different communication protocols.
(Don't ask me how I know)
 
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Old 03-21-19, 12:00 PM
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Per NFPA 72, Tha National Fire Alarm Code, it's 10 years from the date of manufacture.

Stop and think about it. How many smoke alarms have the installation date written on them?

In the 1950s there was a TV quiz show called "You Bet Your Life". It was a funny show, but's nothing funny about life safety. While those smokes may be fine, I don't think it's a good bet.

After all, they're teenagers.
 
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Old 03-21-19, 05:02 PM
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If these are the standard Americium ionization smokes; then the material in the sensing system is mildly radioactive, and does have a half-life. Thus the 10 years from manufacture stricture.

They fall on the scale of "better than nothing" but I would actively test them monthly.
 
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Old 03-21-19, 07:07 PM
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I would personally pass on them, considering their purpose I'd go with new, not worth the risk IMHO.
 
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Old 03-25-19, 01:22 PM
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The photoelectric ones should be safe and have no shelf life expire date on them as long as they are sealed away from dust.
 
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Old 03-25-19, 05:50 PM
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Forget what i said previously and listen to thisoldman. all electronics age and its best to not take risks on life saving devices and just buy them new
 
 

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