Design home security system


  #1  
Old 01-11-24, 12:11 PM
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Design home security system

Where should look for resources to design home security system, we are building home and I am thinking how should I go about designing low voltage or wireless system.. where should I locate the cameras and how do I integrate with recorder and how do I set the internal / external motion alarms .. outside size not too big we use about 12000 sqft. rest of it we dont use just land in the back

My wife bought this costco (deal ) REOlink 4k - 16 channel , 8 camera system , but I am not sure how good or bad it is.. wired .. .. I am planning to give it to electriticion when he does rough in for electricle

any guide ? or pointer will be hlepful. I talked to a few people and they have some ideas but all recomanded different things and lot to choose from.. so I am looking for standard solution and I dont want to sell a limb for it
 

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01-13-24, 05:57 AM
ThisOldMan
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Yeah, with consumer cameras you get what you get. No lens swapping, no back focus adjustment, no auto-iris, etc. Cameras that work for everyone! (And generally don't work well for anyone.)

Like shooting dice, you put your money down and take your chances.
 
  #2  
Old 01-11-24, 01:03 PM
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Wired systems are nice because they can't be hacked or jammed. Unfortunately the wires in the wall can become obsolete over time. My house is full of Siamese Coax which is antiquated by modern standards. If possible I would run conduit from the basement, attic or crawl space to where you want your cameras and sensors. That way new cable can be pulled in the future for whatever the next technology is. If you don't run your security wiring in conduit DO NOT staple or attach the wires inside the walls. That way the old cable can be used to pull new cable if needed.

As for camera placement you monitor the things you want to monitor. And keep in mind that the cameras have to be able to get good images of a person's face. A camera pointed to where you park your car way over there isn't too helpful. If someone steals your car an image of someone isn't very helpful. You need to see the face well enough to identify and use as evidence. So, keep your camera's focal length in mind when picking a location.

I personally don't like having cameras just looking at the door to your home. Everyone is accustomed to cameras there so it's easy for someone to cover their face while kicking in the door. But, many are not ready for a camera just inside to catch them coming through the door. You can also place cameras looking over things someone might want to steal.
 
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  #3  
Old 01-12-24, 05:39 AM
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Thank you, these are very practical and insightful advise.

The not staple thing I will keep in mind.. I dont know if running conduit is cost feasible for cameras but I will ask.

how do I decide on focal length, costco did not give me much information and I dont know what is the correct focal length I should look for .. from the curb to start of home is about 45 feet distance, I am planning to put eh camera at about 14 to 15 feet high from the ground basically mount staring from 2nd floor.
we bought it based on reviews.
https://www.costco.com/reolink----4k...000221346.html

Also, do I need to look at focal lenght or exposure speed ? does this camera actually identify face? it says 4k but this could be just marketing thing.

I am not sure if I will see a setting where I can reduce to 1k or 720p and increase frame rate

found specs on REolink:
Image Sensor : 1/2.49" CMOS Sensor
Video Resolution: Default: 4512X2512 (12 megapixels) at 20 frames/sec
Lens: f=2.8mm; F=1.6, with IR-cut filter
Video Format: H.265
Field of View
• Horizontal: 118
• Vertical: 66
Day & Night: Auto-switching with IR-cut filter
Infrared Night Vision: 30 meters (LED: 2pcs/28mil/850nm)
Color Night Vision: Spotlight: 1pcs/4.3W/6500K/700 Lumens
Frame Rate
• Mainstream: 2fps - 20fps (default: 20fps)
• Substream: 4fps - 20fps (default: 10fps)
Code Rate
• Mainstream: 3072Kbps - 10240Kbps (default: 8192Kbps)
• Substream: 128Kbps - 1024Kbps (default: 768Kbps)
Smart Alarm
Motion detection; person detection; vehicle detection; animal detection
Record Mode
Motion-triggered recording (default); scheduled recording; 24/7 recording
 

Last edited by sendi_t34; 01-12-24 at 06:07 AM.
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Old 01-12-24, 10:25 AM
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I would watch some videos on YouTube showing results from the cameras you have. Type the name and model of your cameras in the search at Youtube and see what comes up. Sometimes you can see how close they placed their cameras and how much face detail they show especially at night.
 
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Old 01-12-24, 04:08 PM
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Most BS consumer products don't tell you about focal length. It basically tells you if your camera has a wide angle, "normal", or telephoto lens. Most inexpensive cameras are wide angle and need to be located closer to facial details but higher resolution can help a lot.

If able I would get one camera running so you can experiment with what it sees. It can be really helpful to learn what the camera can see at what range. Also test it in the dark since the useable range changes. Up close, built-in IR illuminators for night vision can over expose things close up and then on the other end you can learn about the images you get at different ranges in the dark and working under IR illumination.
 
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Old 01-13-24, 05:57 AM
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Yeah, with consumer cameras you get what you get. No lens swapping, no back focus adjustment, no auto-iris, etc. Cameras that work for everyone! (And generally don't work well for anyone.)

Like shooting dice, you put your money down and take your chances.
 
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