Indoor (house) humidity question


  #1  
Old 06-26-23, 07:52 AM
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Indoor (house) humidity question

Why is RH so much higher in one of our bedrooms? I use Govee sensors to track the RH.

We have a 2,500 or so sf colonial-style house (so about 1200 ds and 1200 us, plus a finished basement and attic).

We have central a/c and keep the temp set at 68.

We live in the northeast (southern CT).

It's been very humid past several days (including one very rainy day).

Downstairs Nest thermo (living room) says 62%.
Upstairs (hallway) says 67%
Upstairs bedroom (my home office) govee says 65%
Our main bedroom govee says 71%

Central a/c has been off for a bit hence the 71% in the bedroom. When central a/c runs, main bedroom drops to 63% or so. Not sure what the others drop to as I just started tracking those.

Upstairs has a lot more a/c vents (6; 4 in bedrooms and 2 in bathrooms) and the return, downstairs has a lot less vents (just 3) and is generally a degree or two warmer than upstairs.

I guess my main question here is why would the one bedroom be so high (although I guess it's actually close to the hallway), and is moving between low 60s and just over 70% way too?

It's not even July/August so I'm worried what's going to happen when the summer heat/humidity really kicks in. Although, perhaps once the heat does really kick in, and the central a/c runs more, the indoor RH will drop more and not rise back over 70%?

Thank you.

 
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Old 06-26-23, 10:05 AM
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First, I would bring all your sensors together and leave them next to each other in one room. Then look at their displays. I bet you'll find a range of readings. If you have one sensor that is showing above or below the others you know how to correct for that when it's in a different location. Then you'll know if what your seeing is just uncalibrated instruments (hygrometers) or if you truly have a humidity issue in part of the house.
 
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Old 06-26-23, 11:05 AM
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You don't explain the layout of your house so it's impossible to give specific comments, so I'll generalize. A room's humidity is greatly impacted by its surroundings. It could be that the bedroom gets humidity from an adjoining bathroom. Or, perhaps it's over a particularly damp area of the basement or crawlspace. Garages are often damp; is the bedroom nearby? If the room has a northern exposure, it may be room's not sealed well and moisture is getting in.
 
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Old 06-26-23, 11:21 AM
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Thank you. I did put a few of them together in same room and they are within 1-2 %. I went ahead and calibrated to them to the one in the middle.

In terms of layout, main bedroom does have a bathroom, but we only showered last night, not this morning, so I'm not sure that would cause it to be high. Otherwise, all 4 bedrooms are over living space below, not garage, etc...

In any case, now that sensors are better aligned I will monitor for another couple of days and post back again if I continue to see vast differences.
 
  #5  
Old 06-26-23, 11:23 AM
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Sorry, all that being said, are my readings (whether 60%, 65%, 70%...) too high for a house that's running central a/c? Or is that about right especially when it's extremely humid outside?

Also, our house should be decently sealed as we had one of those energy audits a few years ago where then but the blower fan in the front door and check for leaks everywhere.
 
 

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