What to do with tudor house


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Old 04-12-16, 04:31 PM
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What to do with tudor house

I live in a tudor style home built in 1987 by Pulte. Every year or so I repaint, but this time, I can hit the stucco with a stick, and it just bends inwards. The wood is eaten. There are numerous holes all over the house.
I decided to call a pro. He said that the entire house is rotten and needs $30,000 of work. I am not the richest person in the world.
Since these were cookie cutter houses, I'm not the only one with this model. Many of my neighbors have put vinyl siding up instead. Is that cheaper? I am frustrated and unsure of what to do.
Is it worth it to shell out 30K to keep the look, or to go with vinyl?
This is the house.
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Here is a neighbors with the vinyl
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Old 04-12-16, 07:35 PM
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In your case, vinyl siding is just going to hide the problem not solve it. I don't like vinyl siding anyway. It's too flammable for my liking. One spark from a BBQ or a lawn mower & the house will be gone in seconds. I've seen it happen.
 
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Old 04-12-16, 07:48 PM
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If you can poke a hole through it, that would imply that any underlying sheathing or framing may be affected. If there is no sheathing then you have to remove all of the existing facade and review the insulation, apply sheathing,WRB and the new finish siding.

I think every house built in that time period that used the Masonite stucco panels with wood overlays has the same issue. If you don't like the vinyl siding, you could achieve the same look with cement based panels and trim pieces. You may have issues at the windows if there was no original sheathing applied, something that has to be assessed by someone at the site.

I trust that the figures you quoted are based on a thorough examination and not a number pulled out of a hat. I do a lot of high end restoration and it is certainly not unusual to find a host of issues beneath the surface that can not always be anticipated. It is impossible for anyone here to make a judgement as to the accuracy of the $ 30k figure.
 
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Old 04-12-16, 07:48 PM
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Well, number one, you say "stucco" but for anyone who hasnt figured it out yet, I would bet you have sheets of "stucco siding". LP makes a 7/16" 4x8 stucco sheet, they are about $50 a sheet. You could always take off the trim, replace the worst areas, and reinstall or replace trim as needed. Get by as inexpensively as possible. It would be a shame to lose the Tudor look of your home.
 
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Old 04-13-16, 07:31 PM
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XSleeper, I like your solution. I think I'll "band aid" it for now, and when I get enough money in a couple years, correctly re-side.
 
 

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