Vertical line stucco texture technique


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Old 05-11-16, 07:35 PM
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Vertical line stucco texture technique

My house's exterior wall is CBS (concrete block stucco) and the stucco is textured with a vertical pattern.

This vertical pattern goes from top to bottom where the grooves are about 1/8" wide and spaced about 1/2".







I have approximately 450 linear feet of exterior wall textured this way.

Recently I have replace a few windows and during the process the existing stucco around the windows were broken off. I use a masonry grinder and cleaned up the area so now I have a few rectangular area to re-texture, one such area is shown below.



It is my understanding this texture was applied (in the 70s) with a sacrifier like this.



So I cleaned up the wall. and applied some bonding agent.



Then mixed some stucco.



I tried it in a small narrow strip above the window top. After I applied the stucco I waited a few minutes then used the scarfier over it slowly. The result is not as smooth and clean as the existing texture (applied in 1970s).

It looks like the finish of my stucco is more grainy. Is there another brand where the finish is more smooth?

Also. as I scored the lines with the sacrfier, the grooves made were not smooth and nice, there was some sand crumpled it looks uneven.







I am not too happy with the results. It's very coarse and the edges of the grooves are not clean like the existing.

Is the problem materials or skills?

Is there a way to create a smoother finish? Is there another brand or type of stucco I can use?

What is the best way to make it match the existing? When I use the sacrifier is it supposed to be be used perpendicular to the wall? As I pulled the tool down it scores the lines but the lines formed are not clean. I wonder if I should apply the sacrifier at an angle so as to "press" the grooves in instead of rake the grooves out? I can't seem tp get the clean edges like the existing.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 05-11-16, 09:18 PM
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two more questions.

(1) How long to wait after the stucco is applied to begin using the texture tool? Immediately after or wait?

(2) Should I use a sponge to smooth off the fresh stucco before using the texture tool, or use the tool to texture then lightly smooth? Or no sponging at all?
 
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Old 05-11-16, 09:37 PM
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It's probably a combination of things. I have only used the Quikrete stucco... it seemed pretty smooth. The consistency of the mix is one variable. Yes, you hold the scarifier at an angle. And you should have a garden sprayer handy to wet the surface a little if you feel like it needs a little lubrication. How long you wait is kind of something you have to learn, and depends on how stiff you have mixed it. You generally want to smooth the mix with a steel trowel before you strike it.

Unless my eyes are deceiving me, your scarifier doesn't match the existing. Or does it?
 
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Old 05-12-16, 03:31 AM
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The sacrifier does match but I am thinking back in the 70s they might have used a wider one instead of the 12" version I have.
 
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Old 05-12-16, 04:45 AM
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Stucco mix will also benefit from being misted with water as it cures (over the course of a day or two) rather than letting it dry out too quickly.
 
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Old 05-12-16, 04:50 AM
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in the 70s they might have used a wider one instead of the 12" version I have.
Seems like I remember them using several different sizes made out of wood ..... but then my memory isn't what it once was
 
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Old 05-12-16, 10:07 AM
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Around here we can get smooth stucco it is called EMF or mission finish. It has very fine aggregate. That might be available n your market by some other name. Check with the local plaster or masonry yards. They may know what you have: if you have a chunk f the stuff take it with you. Then you need the mortar the right cnsstency. And as was said before lubricatin. And keep a brush r sponge handy to keep th scratcher clean. I think you have th right tool but maybe a notch trowel can be had with the right groove and space. Then practice to get th right angle.
 
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Old 05-13-16, 08:14 AM
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I figured out how best to create the same effect.

The mix need to be on the wet side, and the texture need to be made immediately after application of the stucco. If wait too long and it starts to dry will not have good results.

Also the way I can get the same effect is to get the tool to "press" and not to "rake". If you try and use it like how you would rake or plow the gound even at an angle, the new stucco would not form a clean edge. The way to do it is to really flex the tines and press the tines into the fresh stucco to make the grooves, then gently raise and move downward. That will create clean edges similar to what I have existing.

Now on to another related subject. I have grinded down the cement around the window edges by about 1/4" so when I apply new stucco it will be flush with what I got. How will I put on a new coat of stucco and still have a bit of a clean outside corner on the edges of the window. Do I need to form up the edges with plywood to stick out 1/4" or just feather it best I can?
 
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Old 05-13-16, 08:53 AM
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Yep, that's why you hold it at an angle.

It sounds to me like you didn't leave enough room around the window. Most window mfg's would recommend backer rod and a caulk joint around the window... not cement up tight against the window. That's a sure way to warp a dark brown window that's in the sun. Maybe aluminum windows are more sturdy... never use them.
 
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Old 05-13-16, 08:58 AM
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The wood grounds is a good idea for an amateur. Also it f you bevel that edge or tip it out by a quarter then when you do the return you will already have a ground made out of stucco. Grounds are anything that you stop against and that regular.ate the thickness n the edge. One other thing. If you left e wall pretty smooth under th grinder you will get better results f you apply a bonding agent bfore you plaster. New stucco will not bond as well to a smooth polished surface as a rougher one but th bonding agent will help. Weld Crete by Larsens products is a good brand. There are other brands.
Glad you figured out th technique.
 
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Old 05-14-16, 05:44 AM
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XSleeper, I meant the outside corner where the walls are not the inside corner where the window meets the stucco. In order to redo the texture I used a concrete grinder to grind down about 1/4" all around. Now when I build back up the wall with stucco when I get to the edges I will either have to feather it out - and that means the last few textured lines will be very shallow, or I have to keep the thickness around the edges somehow.
 
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Old 05-14-16, 05:49 AM
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tightcoat thanks I will be using a bonding agent. I just hope I will be able to make that texture nice and even. I have emulated the pattern on a 12"x12" area without any problem and practiced a few times. BUT when I apply fresh stucco to the entire 36" X 84" area around the window, which will take some time for me as I am not a pro, by the time I start using the tool the fresh stucco would be a bit dryer, and by the time I work from one edge to the other it will be even drier. Would misting the wall with some water out of a squirt bottle help or no difference?
 
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Old 05-14-16, 12:19 PM
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One thing the bonding agent will do is kill some of the suction this should give you more time. Do the work when it s cool. Yes you can wet the work a little. A spray bottle might not be enough. A pump up garden sprayer might be a better bet or a mister on a hose. Can you get some help either to spread it on or scratch it? One putting it on and one making the marks just as soon as possible? How are you spreading it? Are you intending to do e returns around the Windows? Another thing you could do if you can stand making t mess again is grind off more of the base coat. Thicker stucco will dry slower. There is a difference between setting and drying. The material you are using might be setting too fast. If so get something with more time. If it is drying on th wall too fast then work faster or get some help or try wetting it or make th mud thinner n consistency or take a chance without the bonding agent and wet the wall before you apply the material or work smaller sections. Is th 36 X 84 all on one side of the opening or can you do the left then the right then the top and bottom?
 
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Old 05-21-16, 02:26 PM
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Well, I got some results.

Practiced on a cement board a few times and went for it.

Out of the 7 windows I need to patch I got 5 done. The 12" flat wire tool does create a pattern like the existing, but it's real tricky to use.

I started off and did a bit more grinding on the wall to recess it a bit more. Then I applied a coat of bonding agent on the area for the stucco.





I did the top edge, then I progressed from left to right. Applied about 18" width of stucco, then used the 12" tool to do one segment of texture, then immediately go apply another 18" of smooth stucco, then more texture.

If the existing pattern is not perfectly straight I had to follow the same as I move from top to bottom.

Also, if the stucco is too thick in some areas, the stucco may crumble as the tool pass through it. I tried varying the angle and speed, that didn't seem to make a big difference.

Here are some pictures of the results.







Also as I am on an angle from the top down, by the time I get to about 18" from the bottom I had to stop, and go from the bottom up, to meet the same lines. I tried this a few times and I was able to make the lines meet, but I can't avoid the slight "budge" formed where the lines meet. You can see in the next pictures near the bottom where the lines meet and the pattern is disrupted.



 
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Old 05-21-16, 02:39 PM
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So I have a question.

There are areas I did the new stucco that in general as I step back it looks good, but I may have an area say 4"x4" where I messed up where the stucco crumbled or cracked and fell off as the tool passed it.

Once the entire area is dried and set. I would like to repair that area. If I apply a small area of fresh stucco then run the tool over it again in the small area, will that blend in OK or will it be very obvious?
 
 

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